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Rio Grande City in Starr County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Rio Grande City, C.S.A

 
 
Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (<i>side one; faces south</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2018
1. Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (side one; faces south)
Inscription.
(side one)
An official Confederate port of entry, customhouse and major terminus of the cotton road to Mexico. Cotton was the one great money crop of the South that could be sold to hungry European mills for cash for necessary arms, munitions, drugs that had to come from Europe. International ports on the Rio Grande were the South's frail lifelines, its last resource in a war with an industrialized North that manufactured for itself what the South had to import. Cotton arrived at this booming border town on wagons and oxcarts after a hot and dusty trip. It was then ferried across the river and delivered to the neutral ships anchored in the Gulf.
(see other side)
(side two)
Teamsters loaded vital leather goods, clothing, blankets, guns, ammunition and medical supplies for the return trip. Troops from nearby Fort Ringgold guarded the wagon trains and town from bandit raids. In November 1863 Federal forces captured Brownsville and the 1st Texas Union Cavalry advanced up river, captured and occupied this town, seizing the cotton awaiting entry. Rio Grande City was reoccupied in May 1864 and used as a supply and reserve base for the recapture of Brownsville. There was constant danger here from raids by Mexican guerrillas paid by enemy agents to make trouble in Texas.
Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (<i>side two; faces north</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2018
2. Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (side two; faces north)
Draft evaders, Union sympathizers and those wanting to avoid conflicts of war tried to cross the river here. In an arrangement with Mexican officials, Confederates both required and checked passports to curb desertions and smuggling.
 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 4270.)
 
Location. 26° 22.769′ N, 98° 49.228′ W. Marker is in Rio Grande City, Texas, in Starr County. Marker is on Brittan Avenue (northbound) north of 1st Street (Business U.S. 83), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Starr County Courthouse Plaza, midway between 1st and 2nd streets. Marker is in this post office area: Rio Grande City TX 78582, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Old Rancho Davis (within shouting distance of this marker); Starr County (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Rio Grande City (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Cortina Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); Immaculate Conception School (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gregorio Barrera
Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (<i>side one; wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2018
3. Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (side one; wide view)
(about 500 feet away); José de Escandón (about 800 feet away); San Agustín de Laredo a Visita (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rio Grande City.
 
More about this marker. Marker is the 4-foot, polished, pink granite style of the Texas 1964 Civil War Centennial series. Marker is weathered and somewhat difficult to read. This marker is included in the Texas 1964 Civil War Centennial Series.
 
Also see . . .
1. Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail: Ringgold Barracks. During the Civil War, Ringgold changed hands several times, starting in 1861 when it was occupied by Confederate forces. Late in 1863, Union troops re-entered the Rio Grande Valley and seized the camp, only for it to be seized again by rebels led by Colonels John S. “Rip” Ford and Santos Benavides. Because of their efforts, the post stayed in Confederate hands until the end of the war. (Submitted on June 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Rio Grande City Downtown Historic District. Rio Grande City has a long and colorful history dating from its 18th century origins as a Spanish
Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (<i>side two; wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2018
4. Rio Grande City, C.S.A Marker (side two; wide view)
land grant to its place in the Mexican and American Civil Wars and as a Calvary post through the first half of the 20th century. (Submitted on June 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Rio Grande City. Originally formed as part of the Garza Ranch in Mexico, Rio Grande City came into its own when Henry Clay Davis married into the Garza Family. He and his wife, Maria Hilaria (she had a great sense of humor) de la Garza moved here to have some privacy and ended up founding a town. (Submitted on June 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Starr County Courthouse (<i>near marker; at north end of plaza</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 19, 2018
5. Starr County Courthouse (near marker; at north end of plaza)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 4, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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