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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boscawen in Merrimack County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Air Force History in New Hampshire

 
 
Air Force History In New Hampshire Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Marsh
1. Air Force History In New Hampshire Marker
Inscription. Grenier Army Air Field
Manchester Londonderry 1941-1966
Named for Lt Jean Grenier, Army Air Corps pilot killed flying mail in Utah in 1934. During WWII over 52000 crewmembers receive final training in over 9000 B-17, B-24, and other combat aircraft enroute to Europe. Home of the NH Air National Guard (NHANG) and Air Force Reserves.

New Boston Air Force Station
New Boston 1942-
Initially a bombing and gunnery range for Grenier Field converted to a satellite tracking station in in 1960 became home of the 23rd Space Operations Squadron, Air Force Space Command in 1991.

Pease Air Force Base
Portsmith Newington 1956-1991
Named for Capt Hari Pease B-17 pilot killed in New Guinea in 1942. Second Army AF member awarded Medal of Honor in WWII. Built for the Strategic Air Command for the B-47 and KC-97 aircraft of 100th Bomb Wing. The historic 509th Bomb Wing arrives in 1958 and later converts to B-52, KC-135, and FB-111. NHANG relocates from Grenier Field in 1966 flying the C-124 converts to C-130 in 1972 and KC-135 in`1975.

Pease Air National Guard Base
Portsmith Newington 1991-
157th Air Refueling Wing becomes part of the Air Mobility Command
 
Location. 43° 20.083′ N, 71° 38.194′ W.
Air Force Monument Containing History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell
2. Air Force Monument Containing History Marker
New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery
Marker is in Boscawen, New Hampshire, in Merrimack County. Marker can be reached from Daniel Webster Highway. Touch for map. From I-93 North or South to Exit 17 (the cemetery is north of Concord, NH, 5+ miles from I-93). At the top of the Exit ramp, bear right. Follow Route 3 & 4 West through the town of Boscawen. At the intersection of Route 3 & 4 continue to the right on Route 3 North. The cemetery is one mile north on the right side of Route 3. Marker is at or near this postal address: 110 Daniel Webster Hwy, Concord NH 03303, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Birthplace of Hon. Moody Currier (approx. 1˝ miles away); The Webster Homestead (approx. 1.6 miles away); Birthplace of Gen. John A. Dix (approx. 1.8 miles away); Daniel Webster's First Law Office (approx. 1.8 miles away); Site Of First Fort A.D. 1739 (approx. 2 miles away); Birthplace of William Pitt Fessenden (approx. 2.1 miles away); In Grateful Tribute (approx. 7.7 miles away); Northfield WWI Memorial (approx. 7.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boscawen.
 
More about this marker. The marker is one of three markers erected as part of a group of markers and abstract sculpture commemorating the role of the U.S. Air Force in in New Hampshire, beginning with the establishment of Grenier Army Air Field in
New Boston Space Command Tracking Station image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Air Force
3. New Boston Space Command Tracking Station
the Manchester - Londonderry area in 1941.

On July 1, 1997, The New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery was legislatively established. The facility was funded jointly by the state and federal governments. The 104 acres of land was previously used as a state forest in the town of Boscawen, New Hampshire.

US Navy veteran CWO2 Ernest Holm, WWI and WWII, was the first interment at the cemetery on November 18, 1997. The cemetery includes a carillon system, a chapel, a columbarum, a memorial brick walkway, and a history walkway.
 
Regarding Air Force History in New Hampshire. As the marker notes, with respect to the oldest USAF installation in NH, during WWII, Grenier Field in Manchester, 30 miles to the South, became the point of departure for 5,000 heavy bombers and over 50,000 air crewmen who served in the European Theater of Operations, many of whom were never to return home. It was also a major Army Air Corps training facility for thousands of WACs. Sadly there is no marker in Manchester commemorating or mentioning the military history of the site, its impact on the city of Manchester, its role in launching and sustaining the American air war in Europe, or its historic part in integrating women into the armed services.
 
Additional keywords. Cold
Grenier Field Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, December 31, 2014
4. Grenier Field Marker
In 1978 Grenier Field was returned to total civilian control, officially renamed "Manchester Airport", and in 2006 renamed again as the “Manchester - Boston Regional Airport.” The only on-site evidence of the airport’s military past visible to arriving and departing passengers is a marker commemorating Lt Grenier's death, located inside the passenger terminal on the lower level, mounted under a staircase and adjacent to a bank of trash bins and recycling containers.
War, USAFE, ETO, USPS,

 
Categories. Air & SpaceWar, ColdWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Last updated on July 5, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 4, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   3. submitted on July 5, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   4. submitted on July 12, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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