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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

St. Dunstan's Court

 
 
St. Dunstan's Court Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
1. St. Dunstan's Court Marker
Inscription.
1980's, new computerised printing
technology brought about the
demise of the traditional Fleet
Street printing process.
 
Location. 51° 30.857′ N, 0° 6.487′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is on Fleet Street just from St. Dunstan's Court, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 160 Fleet Street, City of London, England EC4A 2DQ, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bolt Court (within shouting distance of this marker); Johnson's Court (within shouting distance of this marker); British Institute of Professional Photography (within shouting distance of this marker); Two Famous Clockmakers (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tipperary (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Samuel Johnson (within shouting distance of this marker); Anti-Corn-Law League (within shouting distance of this marker); The Daily Express (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
More about this marker. This is one of roughly 8 markers set in the pavement along Fleet Street that commemorate various aspects of the printing and newspaper industries.
 
Also see . . .
St. Dunstan's Court Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
2. St. Dunstan's Court Marker - Wide View
The marker is visible here, set into the pavement in the entryway into St. Dunstan's Court.
 Fleet Street (Wikipedia). "...Fleet Street became known for printing and publishing at the start of the 16th century and it became the dominant trade so that by the 20th century most British national newspapers operated from here. Much of the industry moved out in the 1980s after News International set up cheaper manufacturing premises in Wapping, but some former newspaper buildings are listed and have been preserved. The term Fleet Street remains a metonym for the British national press, and pubs on the street once frequented by journalists remain popular." (Submitted on July 7, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Communications
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 7, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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