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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Somerset in Perry County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

General Philip Henry Sheridan

 
 
General Philip Henry Sheridan Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 28, 2008
1. General Philip Henry Sheridan Marker (Side A)
Inscription. (Side A):
Philip Sheridan was most likely born in County Cavan, Ireland in 1831, but records do not indicate his actual birthplace. His family moved to Somerset when Philip was a child and lived down the avenue from this site. His family later owned the house across the street. His military interest was inspired by "Muster" day and frequent visits from a young West Pointer named William T. Sherman. Sheridan graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1853 and served on the Western Frontier Indian campaigns prior to the Civil War. In 1862, Sheridan became Colonel of he Second Michigan Cavalry. At Stones River, Tennessee, he commanded a Division of the Twentieth Corps and stubbornly held General William S. Rosecrans' right flank, distinguishing himself in battle.

(Side B):
At Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, Sheridan's men took the "impregnable" heights, further proving his ability to command. In 1864, General Ulysses S. Grant brought Sheridan east, where he fought General J.E.B. Stuart's vaunted troopers to a draw throughout the summer. His Sixth and Nineteenth Corps cleared Virginia's Shenandoah Valley and defeated the forces of General Jubal Early at Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and the battle of Cedar Creek. The victory at Cedar Creek occurred just before the 1864 presidential election, which helped assure
General Philip Henry Sheridan Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 28, 2008
2. General Philip Henry Sheridan Marker (Side B)
Lincoln's reelection. In addition, Sheridan later blocked Lee's retreat at Appomattox. After the war he served as military governor, military observer in Europe, and commander of the Division of Missouri during the Indian Wars. He became General of the Army in 1884 and died in 1888. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Most of his family is buried down the street in Holy Trinity Cemetery.
 
Erected 2003 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Scotts Company - founded by a Civil War Veteran, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 7-64.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 48.363′ N, 82° 17.909′ W. Marker is in Somerset, Ohio, in Perry County. Marker is at the intersection of Columbus Street (Ohio Route 13) and Sheridan Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Columbus Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Somerset OH 43783, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Sheridan Monument / 1829 Courthouse ( about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Seed of Catholic Education in Ohio / The Cradle of Catholicity in Ohio
Sheridan Family Home image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 26, 2008
3. Sheridan Family Home
( approx. 0.2 miles away); First Lutheran Synod ( approx. 0.2 miles away); The Sheridan Homestead ( approx. 0.6 miles away); Zion Reformed Church ( approx. 6.1 miles away); Birthplace of Thomas A. Hendricks ( approx. 9.7 miles away); Bremen World Wars Memorial ( approx. 9.8 miles away); Wesley Chapel ( approx. 9.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Somerset.
 
Also see . . .  General Sheridan. A short biography of the General. (Submitted on October 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. HeroesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 2, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,705 times since then and 98 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 2, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on October 29, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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