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Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops

 
 
Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
1. Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops Marker
Inscription.  The Grand Review for Union armies took place in Washington, D.C., in late May 1865. The veterans marched down Pennsylvania Avenue past President Andrew Johnson amid the cheers of thousands of grateful citizens. Conspicuously absent, however, were the regiments of the United States Colored Troops (USCT). Despite the fact that more than 180,000 African Americans, including 11 regiments from Pennsylvania, had served in the Union Army, they were not invited to join the celebratory procession.

Black veterans held a parade in Harrisburg on November 14, 1865, however. Thomas Morris Chester, Harrisburg's most distinguished African American, served as grand marshal. The parade formed at State and Filbert Streets (now Soldier’s Grove). The soldiers marched through Harrisburg to the South Front Street residence of U.S. Senator and former secretary of war Simon Cameron. Cameron reviewed the troops from his front porch and thanked them for their service to the nation.

Other speakers included Octavius V. Catto, an African American educator and USCT recruiter from Philadelphia; William Howard Day, abolitionist and clergyman; and Brevet
Brevet Major General Joseph B. Kiddoo image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Army Heritage and Education Center
2. Brevet Major General Joseph B. Kiddoo
Former commander of the 22nd Regiment USCT.
Major General Joseph B. Kiddoo, former commander of the 22nd Regiment USCT. Pennsylvania was the only state to thus honor black soldiers who had helped save the Union.
 
Erected by Pennsylvania Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 40° 15.389′ N, 76° 52.729′ W. Marker is in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is at the intersection of South Front Street and Mary Street, on the left when traveling south on South Front Street. Marker is located in front of the John Harris-Simon Cameron Mansion. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 219 S Front St, Harrisburg PA 17104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Harris Mansion (here, next to this marker); John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree (a few steps from this marker); Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named John Harris, Sr. (a few steps from this marker); The Court House Bell (a few steps from this marker); John Harris / Simon Cameron Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); John Harris Sr. Grave Site (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harrisburg.
 
Related marker.
William Howard Day, abolitionist and clergyman image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of the Historical Society of Dauphin County
3. William Howard Day, abolitionist and clergyman
Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops
 
Also see . . .
1. William Howard Day, Unsung Abolitionist. The name of William Howard Day is not as well-known as Frederick Douglas or Harriet Tubman, although he worked with both of those famous abolitionists in the mid-1800's. Day received a Bachelor's and Master's degree from Oberlin College in Ohio. Later he would attain a Doctorate of Divinity degree from Livingstone College. He became heavily involved in the Underground Railroad, helping escaped slaves flee to Canada. For a time he lived in Canada, working in refugee slave settlements and publishing a newspaper. (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. How Harrisburg honored the African-American troops from the Civil War when no one else would. Several prominent citizens in Harrisburg, both white and black, decided that something should be done to honor the African-American troops that had fought in the war. Several months later, on November 14, 1865, thousands of troops from Pennsylvania and Massachusetts gathered in Harrisburg to be honored by the local citizens. Thousands of soldiers from the United States Colored Troops (USCT) walked through the streets of the city, past cheering residents. While the exact route seems to have been lost through history, it is known that they walked along Front street and past the home of Simon Cameron. (Submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
John Harris/Simon Cameron Mansion (<i>wide view; marker located on sidewalk</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
4. John Harris/Simon Cameron Mansion (wide view; marker located on sidewalk)
 
 
Categories. African AmericansPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 23, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 81 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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