Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree

 
 
John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
1. John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree Marker
Inscription.  
The Story as reported by Robert Harris, grandson of John Harris, Sr., in 1828.
Around 1720, a band of Indians stopped at the Harris trading post requesting rum. John Harris refused to grant them. In anger, they tied Harris to a nearby mulberry tree with the intent of burning him alive. One of the Harris family's slaves, Hercules, paddled over to the West Shore to get help from a tribe living there. They came to rescue Harris, and he was so grateful that he immediately emancipated Hercules and, in doing so, proclaimed his intent of being buried beneath the famed mulberry tree.

What Documented History Tells Us
In 1701, at the request of Indian leaders, William Penn outlawed selling liquor to Indians. At a council held in 1706 with the Conestoga, Shawnee, and Conoy tribes, the Indians asked Governor John Evans to keep traders from meeting Indians returning from the hunt - when they were loaded with furs and pelts - getting them drunk, and taking all the fruits of their hunt before they returned to their wives and families. The governor agreed to require traders to do their trading at Indian towns only. Establishing
Marker detail: <i>The Attempt to Burn John Harris in 1839 – 1840</i>, by William A. Reeder image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: The Attempt to Burn John Harris in 1839 – 1840, by William A. Reeder
trading posts was also part of the solution.

In 1707, Governor John Evans led a contingent of men to "Peixtan" to arrest Nicole Godin, a French trader who had been selling rum to the Indians. Godin was also rumored to be inciting Indians against the English. The Shawnee complained about Pennsylvania's failure to enforce laws against rum traffic.

There is no written record of the attempted burning of John Harris, Sr. at the mulberry tree until 1828, more than 100 years after the event. Robert Harris, John Harris, Jr.'s son, took active steps to preserve the story of the mulberry tree for posterity.

The first known publication of the incident at the mulberry tree was by Samuel Breck, a close friend of Robert Harris, in 1828. William A. Reeder, also a friend of Robert Harris, created the painting of The Attempt to Burn John Harris in 1839 – 1840. The original painting, 3'-8.5" long and 2'6.5" wide, hung in the old Capitol building for many years.

George W. Harris, John Harris Sr.’s great grandson, continued the story in telling I. Daniel Rupp for his book History of Dauphin County published in 1846.

When Mr. Harris, Sr. died in 1748, he was buried under the mulberry tree as he had requested. In his will, drawn up 1846, John Harris directed that, "It is my will that that my negro man Hercules be set free & be allowed
John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree Marker (<i>tall view; South Front Street in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
3. John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree Marker (tall view; South Front Street in background)
to live on a part of the tract purchased of James Allco… left to my son William.”

The people of Harrisburg assigned great significance to the mulberry tree, and went to extraordinary lengths to preserve it. By 1840 it was still complete to the stumps of the first branches, and had been whitewashed for preservation.

The wood gavel and ballot box held at the HSDC are labeled with metal plates as having been made from the wood of the mulberry tree.
 
Location. 40° 15.395′ N, 76° 52.733′ W. Marker is in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Front Street and Mary Street, on the left when traveling south. Marker is located on the grounds of the John Harris Mansion, on the north side of the mansion. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 219 South Front Street, Harrisburg PA 17104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Native Nations of the Susquehanna Valley (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named John Harris, Sr. (here, next to this marker); John Harris Mansion (a few steps from this marker); Harrisburg's Grand Review of Black Troops
John Harris, Sr. Mulberry Tree Marker (<i>wide view; marker on left; related markers on right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
4. John Harris, Sr. Mulberry Tree Marker (wide view; marker on left; related markers on right)
(a few steps from this marker); The Court House Bell (a few steps from this marker); John Harris/Simon Cameron Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); John Harris Sr. Grave Site (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harrisburg.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansNotable EventsSettlements & Settlers
 
John Harris Mansion (<i>marker is on north side of mansion, just left of this image</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 20, 2018
5. John Harris Mansion (marker is on north side of mansion, just left of this image)
 

More. Search the internet for John Harris, Sr., and the Mulberry Tree.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 78 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement