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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenbelt in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Methodist Preaching Place

1776-1803

 
 
Methodist Preaching Place Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 18, 2006
1. Methodist Preaching Place Marker
Inscription. Bishop Francis Asbury, builder of Methodism in America, recorded nine visits to this place. The farm, called "Wild Cat," belonged to Shadrick Turner, planter. He and his wife Sarah, zealous laymen, hosted many meetings. Several United Methodist churches of Prince Georges's County stem from this early preaching.

Nearby is the Turner family graveyard, the only remains of "Wild Cat." In 1941 the property was deeded to the City of Greenbelt to be a part of the City Cemetery.
 
Erected by Prince George's County Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher marker series.
 
Location. 39° 0.446′ N, 76° 53.539′ W. Marker is in Greenbelt, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Kenilworth Avenue (Maryland Route 201) north of Crescent Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This is near the interchange with the Beltway (I-95). Marker is in this post office area: Greenbelt MD 20770, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Greenbelt Lake (approx. 0.3 miles away); Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Tree (approx. 0.4 miles away); Toaping Castle (approx. mile away); Eleanor Roosevelt
Methodist Preaching Place Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs
2. Methodist Preaching Place Marker
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Community Center (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenbelt.
 
Regarding Methodist Preaching Place. The Turner Cemetery is located just off Kenilworth Avenue on Ivy Lane.
 
Also see . . .
1. Francis Asbury, 1745-1816. (Submitted on February 25, 2006.)
2. America's Bishop: The Life of Francis Asbury. by Dennis F. Kinlaw. This is the amazon.com page for this book. (Submitted on February 25, 2006.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Origins of the Greenbelt Cemetery
Text of the historical sketch posted at the cemetery to the right of the Turner headstone. It is not signed or dated.

On the 2,623 acres of land purchased in 1935 where President Roosevelt's first planned garden town was to be constructed, three old family cemeteries were known to exist. These cemeteries belonged to the Hamilton, Turner, and Walker Families. Remains from other burials and family cemeteries were uncovered when the land was cleared for construction, and these were relocated to the most accessible cemetery, that of the Turner family. When a construction worker died whose family was unknown, he was buried there and so were a few residents during Greenbelt's early years of existence. These are the origins of the Greenbelt Cemetery.

The Turners came to this site in 1759, when Shadrick Turner purchased a 125 acre farm known as "Wild Cat". Most of it lay to the east of this cemetery.
Last Remaining Turner Gravestone and Posted History of the Turner Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 18, 2006
3. Last Remaining Turner Gravestone and Posted History of the Turner Cemetery
Gravestone reads To the memory of Thomas P. Turner who departed this life September 25 in 1855, aged 15 years. The historical sketch is transcribed elsewhere on this page.
Shadrick Turner later acquired additional farms, but he and his wife, Sarah, always lived on Wild Cat, where they raised nine children. At the time of the 1776 census, they ranged in age from 1 to 25 years. Shadrick turner was a devout Methodist. He and Bishop Francis Asbury are honored today as the principal founders of the First United Methodist Church of Hyattsville, one of the oldest Methodist churches in America. Bishop Asbury and various circuit riders always stayed with the Turners when they were in this area.

Regarding the Turner Cemetery, the Bible of Sarah Turner records 12 deaths, beginning with Shadrick on October 2, 1799 and ending with young Thomas Parker Turner on September 25, 1855, who died at the age of 15. His is the only legible headstone remaining, and is located next to this document. The Turners occupied the farm until 1935, when it was sold to the Federal Government. The cemetery was deeded to the City of Greenbelt in 1941.
    — Submitted March 21, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Entrance to the Turner Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 18, 2006
4. Entrance to the Turner Cemetery
Now the Greenbelt Cemetery, it is on Ivy Lane one block west of Kenilworth Avenue (Maryland Route 201).
The Greenbelt / Turner Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 18, 2006
5. The Greenbelt / Turner Cemetery
The Greenbelt / Turner Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, March 18, 2006
6. The Greenbelt / Turner Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 25, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,703 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 25, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 21, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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