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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lancaster in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre

December 27, 1763

 
 
Site of Conestoga Indain Massacre 1763 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 13, 2018
1. Site of Conestoga Indain Massacre 1763 Marker
Inscription.
Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre
December 27, 1763

 
Location. 40° 2.278′ N, 76° 18.507′ W. Marker is in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in Lancaster County. Marker is on North Water Street north of West King Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is mounted above eye-level on the back wall of the historic Fulton Theater, facing Water Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12 North Prince Street (backside of the building), Lancaster PA 17603, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Durang (a few steps from this marker); Old Jail (within shouting distance of this marker); Early Architecture (within shouting distance of this marker); John F. Reynolds (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bailey's Printshop (about 600 feet away); Historic Site in Journalism (about 600 feet away); John Frederick Steinman, Ph. B., LL. D. (about 600 feet away); James Hale Steinman, A.B., LL. B., LL.D. (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lancaster.
 
More about this marker. This plaque marks the site of the Old Lancaster Jail, where the massacre occurred.
 
Related markers.
Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre Marker (<i>wide view; near door on back side Fulton Theater</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 13, 2018
2. Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre Marker (wide view; near door on back side Fulton Theater)
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The Conestoga Indian Massacre of 1763
 
Also see . . .
1. Ethnic Cleansing in Pennsylvania: The 1763 Massacre of the Conestoga. The series of events that lead to the atrocity included rumors in the commonwealth in 1763 that local tribes were joining Chief Pontiacís call to attack colonists. Supposedly in reaction to that rumor, a small group of Scotch-Irish men from Harrisburg, who came to be known as the Paxton Boys, rode to the Conestogasí village near Lancaster and killed six men, and then burned their cabins on December 14, 1763. Lancaster authorities moved the 14 Conestoga survivors to a workhouse in the city for their protection. On December 27, the Paxton Boys followed them there and laid siege to the workhouse. The local sheriff got out of their way after being threatened and the Paxtons brutally slaughtered the 14 Conestoga men, women and children. (Submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Paxton Boys. The colonial government held an inquest and determined that the killings were murder. The new governor, John Penn offered a reward for capture of the Paxton Boys. Penn placed the remaining sixteen Conestoga in protective custody in Lancaster but the Paxton Boys broke in on December 27, 1763. They killed, scalped and dismembered six adults and eight children. The government of Pennsylvania offered a new
Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre Marker (<i>back wall of Fulton Theater; marker near center</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 13, 2018
3. Site of Conestoga Indian Massacre Marker (back wall of Fulton Theater; marker near center)
reward after this second attack, this time $600, for the capture of anyone involved. The attackers were never identified. (Submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 2, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Last updated on August 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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