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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Macon in Bibb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Confederate States Central Laboratory

 
 
Confederate States Central Laboratory Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 5, 2002
1. Confederate States Central Laboratory Marker
Inscription. Approximately 100 feet south of the this point stood the Confederate States Central Laboratory. Erected between 1862 and 1865, this laboratory-factory complex spread over 145 acres purchased December 2, 1862. It was intended as permanent facility and center of Confederate States Ordinance testing and production. Its main building was a two storied brick and granite structure 600 feet long. Superintendent of all C.S. Laboratories Lt. Col. John W. Mallet selected this site and had his headquarters here. Machinery and equipment for the facility were fabricated in Macon, Atlanta, Richmond and Leeds, England. After contributing much to the southern war effort, the site was surrendered on April 20, 1865, to Union Gen. James H. Wilson. A law suit followed over the title of the property which was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in the 'Titus v. U.S.' (1874), a decision which recognized the existence of the Confederate States.
 
Erected 1994 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 011-24.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 50.979′ N, 83° 40.397′ W. Marker is in Macon, Georgia, in Bibb County.
Confederate States Central Laboratory Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 4, 2011
2. Confederate States Central Laboratory Marker
Looking northwest on Vineville Avenue (US 41)
Marker is at the intersection of Vineville Avenue (U.S. 41) and Vista Circle, on the right when traveling north on Vineville Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3051 Vineville Avenue, Macon GA 31204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Vineville United Methodist Church (approx. 1.3 miles away); St. Peter Claver Catholic Church and School (approx. 1.5 miles away); Mercer University (approx. 2 miles away); Site: Wesleyan College (approx. 2.1 miles away); Wesleyan College (approx. 2.1 miles away); Oak Ridge Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); a different marker also named Oak Ridge Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Unknown, But Not Forgotten (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Macon.
 
Also see . . .
1. Confederate Ordnance. In a postwar Report, the laboratory was described:
Another permanent work erected was a central ordnance laboratory for the production of artillery and small-arms ammunition and miscellaneous articles of ordnance stores. This was decided on in September, 1861, placed in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. Mallet, and located at Macon, Georgia. It was designed to be an elaborate establishment, especially for the fabrication of percussion-caps, friction-primers, and pressed bullets, in addition to heavier ordnance supplies. Special machinery was made in England and shipped, but did not reach its destination in time for use. A large instalment including a most powerful pair of engines, had reached Bermuda when blockade running practically came to an end, near the close of the war. (Submitted on October 10, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Macon as an Ordnance Center: The Central Laboratory. A chapter from Civil War Macon. (Submitted on October 10, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 2,009 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 9, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on July 13, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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