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Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Anson Jones

(January 20, 1798 - January 9, 1858)

 
 
Anson Jones Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
1. Anson Jones Marker
Inscription.  Anson Jones was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He earned his M.D. degree in Philadelphia in 1827; by October 1833, Jones had moved to Texas, establishing a successful medical practice in Brazoria. In 1835, he helped organize Holland Lodge No. 36, the first Masonic Lodge in Texas. In 1836, Jones joined in Texas' War for Independence and served as Judge Advocate and surgeon of the Second Regiment. He fought as a private in the Battle of San Jacinto.

After the war, Jones returned to his medical practice and in 1837 was elected to the House of Representatives. That year, he was also elected as the first Grand Master of Masons in Texas and was among the noted charter members who organized the Philosophical Society of Texas. In 1838, Sam Houston appointed Jones as Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Texas. In this position, he began to stimulate American support for annexation by strengthening Texas' ties with Great Britain and France, playing at U.S. insecurities.

Jones married Mary Smith McCrory in 1840; she was later elected the first president of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. In 1841, President
Anson Jones Gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
2. Anson Jones Gravesite
Houston appointed Jones as Secretary of State, where he further encouraged annexation. In 1844, Jones was elected president of the Republic of Texas; he became the country's last president when the U.S. annexed Texas on December 29, 1845. At a formal ceremony in Austin on February 19, 1846, Jones lowered the Lone Star flag and declared, "the Republic of Texas is no more." He retired to Barrington, his plantation near what is now Washington-on-the-Brazos, where he spent much of his time writing. Today, Anson Jones is remembered for his multitude of accomplishments, including those that earned him the nickname, "The Architect of Annexation."
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15812.)
 
Location. 29° 45.937′ N, 95° 23.123′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Washington Avenue and Custus Street, on the right when traveling east. Anson Jones is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Section F-1, Lot 018, near the cemetery office. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2525 Washington Avenue, Houston TX 77007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James S. and Alfred T. Lucas (within shouting distance of this marker); David Finney Stuart, M.D. (within shouting distance of this
Anson Jones Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
3. Anson Jones Grave Marker
marker); Belle Sherman Kendall (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rev. William M. Tryon (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel B.F. Terry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Irvin Capers Lord (about 400 feet away); Darius Gregg (about 400 feet away); Caspar Braun (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Also see . . .  Jones, Anson - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on September 4, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsPoliticsScience & MedicineWar, Texas Independence
 

More. Search the internet for Anson Jones.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 4, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 70 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 4, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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