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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Amherst in Amherst County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Reverend Robert Rose

1704-1751

 
 
The Reverend Robert Rose Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 7, 2018
1. The Reverend Robert Rose Marker
Inscription.
To honor
The Reverend Robert Rose
1704-1751
First Minister of St. Annís Parish in
Old Albermarle County 1747-1751

This tablet commemorates the establishment
by him of St. Markís Church at Maple Run 1748

To the present site, in Amherst County,
the Church was moved in 1816

Tablet erected by some of his descendants – 1958

 
Erected 1958 by Some of His Descendents.
 
Location. 37° 38.411′ N, 79° 1.347′ W. Marker is near Amherst, Virginia, in Amherst County. Marker is on Patrick Henry Highway (Virginia Route 151) 0.2 miles south of Fletchers Level Road (Virginia Route 610), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is mounted at on the front of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, just to the right of the main entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 670 Patrick Henry Highway, Amherst VA 24521, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Grave of Patrick Henryís Mother (approx. 0.3 miles away); Action at Tye River (approx. 3Ĺ miles away); The Rivers (approx. 3.6 miles away); The Scale House
The Reverend Robert Rose Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible on front of St. Mark's Church</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 7, 2018
2. The Reverend Robert Rose Marker (wide view; marker visible on front of St. Mark's Church)
(approx. 3.9 miles away); The Courage of Frank Padget (approx. 4 miles away); Amherst County Confederate Soldiers Monument (approx. 4.1 miles away); Hurricane Camille (approx. 4Ĺ miles away); American Cyanamid (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Amherst.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Short History of St. Mark's Episcopal Church. St. Mark's is the direct successor of the first Christian church established in 1747 in what is now Amherst County. The parish was represented at the convention at which the Diocese of Virginia was formed; it subscribed to the expenses of the first General Convention, as well as voted for convention deputies. Clifford (formerly New Glasgow) was a flourishing town in Revolutionary times. In 1778, Amherst Parish, which included what is now Amherst and Nelson Counties, was divided, and Amherst County took the name Lexington Parish in honor of the Battle of Lexington. (Submitted on September 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Rev Robert Rose. On March 16, 1749, the remarkable planter-minister Robert Rose introduced a new era in Piedmont with the discovery that two canoes lashed together
St. Mark's Episcopal Church (<i>south side view; marker visible near front corner</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 7, 2018
3. St. Mark's Episcopal Church (south side view; marker visible near front corner)
could convey downstream eight or nine hogsheads of tobacco as compared to one hogshead on a single canoe. (Submitted on September 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 32 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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