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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Houston in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

James S. and Alfred T. Lucas

 
 
James S. and Alfred T. Lucas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
1. James S. and Alfred T. Lucas Marker
Inscription. James Sherwood Lucas (1836-1888) and his son Alfred T. Lucas (1863-1922) immigrated to the United States and became influential brick masons and contractors who helped develop the city of Houston. James Lucas was born in Nottingham, England, to registered brick layer Thomas Lucas and Ann Lucas. At age 34, James, his wife Emily and their four children traveled aboard the British steamship Alice from Liverpool to New Orleans. By 1873, the family settled in Houston. From 1870 until his death in 1888, James Lucas built a lasting testament to his talents as seen at the 1884-85 Houston Cotton Exchange building and the 1883 Preston Street bridge.

By the age of sixteen, Alfred T. Lucas, James Lucasí son was an apprentice to his father. After his fatherís death, Alfred continued the family contracting company. Lucas worked with Eugene T. Heiner on the 1896 Harris County Jail and Criminal Court building and the 1899 Lavaca County Courthouse. Along with John Stadtler, Lucas build ten professional buildings and three private homes, including 1891 Houston Light Guard Armory, Henke and Company store, Magnolia and American Breweries and the Houston Water Works pump house.

Lucas also helped build the 1895 city auditorium and the 1903 Houston City Hall and Market Place. His company, Lucas Brick Works, paved many of Houstonís
James S. Lucas Gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
2. James S. Lucas Gravesite
streets, mostly from bricks produced at their brick yard on Buffalo Bayou near Shepherd and San Felipe. Jame and Alfred T. Lucas, two generations of brick masons, left a legacy of craftsmanship that aided in the development and expansion of Houston.
 
Erected 2016 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18533.)
 
Location. 29° 45.914′ N, 95° 23.127′ W. Marker is in Houston, Texas, in Harris County. Marker can be reached from Washington Avenue. Touch for map. Alfred Lucas in buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Section F-1, Lot 009. James Lucas is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Section F-1, Lot 008. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2525 Washington Avenue, Houston TX 77007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Rev. William M. Tryon (a few steps from this marker); David Finney Stuart, M.D. (a few steps from this marker); Colonel B.F. Terry (within shouting distance of this marker); Anson Jones (within shouting distance of this marker); Irvin Capers Lord (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Belle Sherman Kendall (about 300 feet away); Darius Gregg (about 500 feet away); Archibald Wynns (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Houston.
 
Categories. ArchitectureNotable Persons
 
Alfred T. Lucas Gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
3. Alfred T. Lucas Gravesite
James S. Lucas Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
4. James S. Lucas Grave Marker
Alfred T. Lucas Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, September 3, 2018
5. Alfred T. Lucas Grave Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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