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Fort Oglethorpe in Catoosa County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment

Sirwells Brigade

 

—Negley’s Division —

 
78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, May 4, 2011
1. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker
Front of the monument.
Inscription.
Text on the front of the monument

The
Commonwealth
of
Pennsylvania.

to
her 78th Infantry Regiment
Lieut. Col. Archibald Kelly, Commanding.

Chickamauga -- Chattanooga
Sept. 18th 19th and 20th, 1863 – Nov. 23rd 24th and 25th, 1863
Sirwells Brigade -- Starkweathers Brigade
Negley’s Division -- Johnson’s Division
Thomas’s Corps -- Palmer’s Corps
Army of the Cumberland


Text on the back of the monument.

78th
Pennsylvania.


Night of the 18th and Forenoon of the 19th Sept., 1863, held fords of the Chickamauga protecting McCook’s Corps. Marched from McLemores Cove to the battle field.

Afternoon of the 19th followed McCook passing him in action south of Widow Glenn’s house.

Formed on the crest of the hill north of Widow Glenn house. Charged on echelon across Dyer field against the enemy, then holding these (Brothernton) woods. Drove him beyond this position, and held it under fire until 9:30 A.M. of 20th. Then ordered to Snodgrass Hills and formed across Hill East of Snodgrass house. Defending for two hours a battery firing over the Regiment from Snodgrass house.

Then by orders from Brigade and Division commanders marched
78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, May 4, 2011
2. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker
Close up of the front of the monument.
over hills to McFarland gap and formed across Dry Valley road halted and reformed disorganized troops retreating from the broken right wing until after dark.

Was in the movements of 21st on Missionary Ridge and at night fell back with the Army to the new lines for the defense of Chattanooga.

With the Army of the Cumberland and in the subsequent engagement about Chattanooga.
 
Erected 1894 by State of Pennsylvania. (Marker Number MT-1048.)
 
Location. 34° 54.678′ N, 85° 15.829′ W. Marker is in Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in Catoosa County. Marker can be reached from LaFayette Road one mile south of Viniard Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This marker is located in the national park that preserves the site of the Chickamauga Battlefield. Marker can be reached from LaFayette Road one mile south of Brotherton Road, on the right when traveling south. This marker is on the west side of LaFayette Road along a hiking path that connects LaFayette Road and Glenn-Kelly Road. The path crosses LaFayette Road between the Glenn Field and the Brotherton Field. The path branches several times, this marker is along a path (take the second right when the trail splits) north of the main path. This marker can also be reached
78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, May 4, 2011
3. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker
View of the back of the monument.
from the Brothernton Field.

In locating this tablet I used the "Chickamauga Battlefield" map, that I purchased at the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Visitor Center, to determine both the marker number for this tablet and the tablet's location in relation to the rest of the park's monuments, markers, and tablets. According to the map it provides the, "numerical listing of all monuments, markers, and tablets on the Chickamauga Battlefield (using the Chick-Chatt NMP Monument Numbering System)”. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Oglethorpe GA 30742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 21st Illinois Infantry (here, next to this marker); 38th Illinois Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 65th Ohio Infantry Regiment (about 500 feet away); Johnson's Brigade (about 700 feet away); Davis' Division (approx. 0.2 miles away); Davis' Division, McCook's Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); 35th Illinois Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Negley's Division, Thomas' Corps. (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Oglethorpe.
 
More about this marker. This monument was built, in 1894, of Granite and stands on a limestone base. According to the
78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, May 4, 2011
4. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker
Close up of the back of the monument.
National Park Service, the marker is “7'4" x 5'6" x 12' high, monument has 2-step rock-faced base and simple slab-like shaft which is polished on its front and carries an inscription. Acorn is carved into upper step of base. Top is peaked.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Death Knell of the Confederacy. Link to the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park web page. (Submitted on September 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

2. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Monument. This is a link to information provided by the National Park Service regarding this particular monument. (Submitted on September 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

3. Battle of Chickamauga. Overview of the battle provided by the American Battlefield Trust. (Submitted on September 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. Parks & Recreational AreasWar, US Civil
 
78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, May 4, 2011
5. 78th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment Marker
View of the front and one side of the monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 15, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 22 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 12, 2018, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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