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Oscoda in Iosco County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

First Methodist Church

 
 
First Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 24, 2018
1. First Methodist Church Marker
Inscription. Erected in 1865 A.D. by the pioneer lumberman, Henry Martin Loud, who in that year founded in this area one of the largest lumber operations in Michigan.

The church burned in the fire which destroyed the town of Au Sable and most of the adjoining town of Oscoda, July 11, 1911, with the loss of four lives and three thousand persons rendered homeless. The Reverend Levi Bird was the pastor at that time.
 
Erected by Iosco County Historical Society.
 
Location. 44° 25.177′ N, 83° 19.912′ W. Marker is in Oscoda, Michigan, in Iosco County. Marker is at the intersection of West Dwight Avenue and Pearl Street, on the right when traveling west on West Dwight Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is mounted at waist-level, directly on the Oscoda United Methodist Church, near the southwest corner of the building, facing south. Marker is at or near this postal address: 120 West Dwight Avenue, Oscoda MI 48750, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Greenbush School (approx. 11 miles away); The Changing Shape of Tawas Point (approx. 12.8 miles away); Preserving the Light (approx. 12.8 miles away); A New Light on the Horizon
First Methodist Church Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible near left edge of building</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 24, 2018
2. First Methodist Church Marker (wide view; marker visible near left edge of building)
(approx. 12.8 miles away); Tawas Point Light Station (approx. 12.8 miles away); Oil House (approx. 12.8 miles away); Double Dwelling (approx. 12.8 miles away); Tawas Lighthouse (approx. 12.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large, rust-colored, embossed, metal plaque, possibly copper.
 
Also see . . .
1. The 1911 Oscoda Fire. On July 11, a warm summer day in 1911, the neighboring cities of Oscoda and AuSable (Michigan) burned to the ground in what has been called the "most devastating fire in the history of Michigan". Both cities were constructed entirely of wood, due to the heavy influence of the lumber trade in those years. Not a single concrete sidewalk or building could be found, which made the communities perfect bait for the hungry, rapid flames. Most people waded out into the cold, rough lake until they were neck-deep, holding children and the few possessions they managed to rescue over their heads. Most of the residents of AuSable and Oscoda had to start their domestic lives over from scratch after the fire. Many moved permanently to East Tawas, Bay City or Port Huron and were eventually able to find jobs, set aside some savings, build houses, and live normally once
Oscoda United Methodist Church (<i>wide view; southwest corner</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 24, 2018
3. Oscoda United Methodist Church (wide view; southwest corner)
again. (Submitted on September 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Century-old Fires: Oscoda, MI, July 11, 1911. A forest fire closed in on Oscoda and the adjacent town of Au Sable, causing their 1,800 inhabitants to escape the flames in a large steamship and a special train made up of freight cars. As the people were hurried to safety, the fires descended and destroyed both towns. Several other towns were threatened and 40 cars and two bridges of the Michigan Central Railroad were also destroyed. A telegraph lineman made his way around the fire and climbed a pole four miles south of the flames to report conditions to authorities. (Submitted on September 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Henry Martin Loud. Henry Martin Loud (1824—1905) was a Michigan lumber magnate, politician, lay Methodist preacher, and philanthropist. Loud was a contributor to the Bayview Association of the United Methodist Church "a pioneering institution in public education" which bears a building — Loud Hall — in his name. Loud was president of White Iron Lake, Iron And Water Power Company and owned 500 acres of land in Paloma, California for citrus farming. H. M. Loud & Sons was established in 1885 with stock of the Au Sable & North Western Railroad incorporated in 1891. A decedent of Clan MacLeoid of Scotland by his father Austin Loud, his lineage
Oscoda United Methodist Church (<i>west side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 24, 2018
4. Oscoda United Methodist Church (west side view)
also traces to Jonathan Brewster (eldest son of Elder William Brewster and Mary Brewster of the Mayflower Voyage). (Submitted on September 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionDisasters
 
Oscoda United Methodist Church (<i>southeast corner view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 24, 2018
5. Oscoda United Methodist Church (southeast corner view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 31 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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