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Albion in Cassia County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Cassia County Courthouse

Frontier Law in Cassia County

 
 
Cassia County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 15, 2018
1. Cassia County Courthouse Marker
Captions: (bottom ovals, l to r) Kirkland I. Perky, James Hawley, William E. Borah.
Inscription. The year was 1885 when Cassia County purchased an unfinished hovel for its first courthouse. Idaho was still a territory - a place where disagreements were at times decided by the business end of a gun. Sparked by disputes between cattle and sheep ranchers over water and grass during the 1890's, this courthouse became the scene of one of the most publicized trails in Idaho Territory.

A notorious gunman, Jackson Lee Davis, who was better known as "Diamondfield Jack" was hired by the Sparks-Harrell cattle company to restrict sheep herders from crossing to the west side of Goose Creek. Due to his reputation and a previous non-fatal shooting Davis was arrested for the murder of two sheepherders, and became a pawn in the battle between cattlemen and sheepherders, Mormons and non-Mormons, and Democrats and Republicans.
The sensational trial brought prominent attorneys from the highest rank. William E. Borah who later became an Idaho Senator served as the main prosecutor. Diamondfield Jack was defended by James Hawley, a prominent criminal lawyer from Boise who later became governor of Idaho, and Kirkland I. Perky, one time law partner of William Jennings Bryan.
Based on circumstantial evidence, Jack Davis was convicted of murder in February of 1896, and sentenced to be hanged. As Diamondfield Jack awaited
Cassia County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 15, 2018
2. Cassia County Courthouse Marker
Marker on the left
execution two cattlemen confessed to the murders. After nearly 7 years in prison and several stays of execution, the State Board of Pardons finally exonerated Diamondfield Jack.
Jack David moved to Nevada where he became a successful mine operator in the towns of Tonopah and Goldfield. The once notorious gunman faded into the shadows when in 1949 Diamondfield Jack died after being hit by a taxi in Las Vegas.
 
Erected by City of Rocks Back Country Byway.
 
Location. 42° 24.745′ N, 113° 34.68′ W. Marker is in Albion, Idaho, in Cassia County. Marker is on Main Street (State Highway 77 at milepost 18) near South Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Albion ID 83311, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Diamondfield Jack (here, next to this marker); Idahome (approx. 9.1 miles away); Mc Clendon Springs (approx. 10.3 miles away); California Trail - Leaving Cassia Creek (approx. 11.4 miles away); California Trail - Cassia Creek (approx. 11.7 miles away); Where Trails Meet - Raft River Valley Trails (approx. 11.8 miles away); Hudspeth's Cutoff (approx. 11.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Diamondfield Jack -- Albion Historical Society
Diamondfield Jackson Lee Davis image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer
3. Diamondfield Jackson Lee Davis
. Little is known about Diamondfield Jack’s early life. He was born about 1879 somewhere in the East. By 1892, he was working in the Black Jack mine in the Silver City district of Owyhee County. He left the Black Jack to follow rumors of a diamond strike in the nearby hills. He failed to find any diamonds, but talked so much of the diamond field that he earned the nickname “Diamondfield Jack.” (Submitted on September 30, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Law EnforcementNotable Persons
 
City of Rocks Back Country Byway image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 15, 2018
4. City of Rocks Back Country Byway
Click on image to enlarge the informational sign.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 30, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 30 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 30, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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