Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sioux Falls in Minnehaha County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Dakota, D.T.

 
 
Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (<i>side one</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
1. Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (side one)
Inscription.  
(side one)
Residents fled Sioux Falls City, Dakota Territory, after the 1862 slaying of the Amidons. The town site was abandoned until May 5, 1865, when Lt. Col. John Pattee chose this location for Fort Brookings, a new military post.

Construction began after a 48-oxen-drawn wagon train of supplies arrived from Sioux City, Iowa. Soldiers built shelters for horses, supplies, and the garrison. In time the post grew in size to 18 buildings and was renamed Fort Dakota. An elevated lookout and a military cemetery were added on the

(side two)
west bluff.

An abandoned quartzite building became the commissary, while a new enlisted menís barracks was built of timbers. A stone round tower, 15-feet in height and 30-feet in diameter, was constructed. Two bronze 12-pounder mountain howitzers were mounted on its deck.

The presence of Fort Dakota calmed tensions in the Big Sioux River Valley. It not only offered new settlers a sense of security but also routinely fed hungry Dakota Indians who had been banished from their Minnesota homeland.

Fort Dakota closed in 1869

Dedicated
Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (<i>side two</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
2. Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (side two)
in 2005 by
the Minnehaha County Historical Society
in Honor of Alex and Nick Huber

 
Erected 2005 by The Minnehaha County Historical Society, in Honor of Alex and Nick Huber.
 
Location. 43° 32.958′ N, 96° 43.599′ W. Marker is in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in Minnehaha County. Marker is on North Phillips Avenue 0.1 miles north of East 8th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the sidewalk, on the east side of Phillips Avenue, at the north end of a parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 North Phillips Avenue, Sioux Falls SD 57104, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cigar Manufacturing (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Orpheum Theater (about 500 feet away); Illinois Central Depot (about 600 feet away); Early Sioux Falls (about 700 feet away); Urban Renewal (about 700 feet away); Recreation (about 700 feet away); Flooding (about 700 feet away); Quarries (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sioux Falls.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Dakota. (This link presents some historic photos of Fort Dakota.)
Settlers and speculators began laying land claims around the Falls of the Big Sioux River in 1856. A military post was established to protect them from occasional negative encounters with the Native people
Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (<i>tall view; looking north along Phillips Avenue</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 21, 2016
3. Fort Dakota, D.T. Marker (tall view; looking north along Phillips Avenue)
in the area. In 1862, after Judge Joseph Amidon and his son William were killed by a band of hostile Indians, and as the Sioux Uprising was escalating in Minnesota, the town was abandoned. Settlers and soldiers relocated to Yankton in August of 1862. (Submitted on October 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fort Dakota. (This links to a CSPAN video presentation about Fort Dakota.)
Bill Hoskins talks about Fort Dakota and what life was like for soldiers at this distant military outpost. Fort Dakota was established by the U.S. Military in 1865 as tensions between American Indians and white settlers grew. (Submitted on October 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Fort Dakota, D.T. - 1865-1869. Fort Dakota was a typical outpost of the frontier period. As with most temporary posts of the time, it looked more like a village than a fort since the chances of a frontal attack were remote. Few outposts across the frontier displayed stockades or other defenses. The big threats at Fort Dakota consisted of an occasional Sioux Indian running off with post horses or harassing settlers encroaching their homeland. Fort Dakota was a loosely grouped collection of buildings constructed from local naturally occurring materials surrounded by a simple rail fence to keep the grazing stock from wandering. (Submitted on October 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
More. Search the internet for Fort Dakota, D.T..
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 33 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the bookís title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.