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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Washington in Wood County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Washington Bottom

 
 
Washington Bottom Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 28, 2018
1. Washington Bottom Marker
Inscription. A tract of 2314 acres was acquired by George Washington three miles west on Dec. 15, 1772, for services in the French and Indian War. It was surveyed by William Crawford in June, 1771. It bordered for five miles on the Ohio River.
 
Location. 39° 14.358′ N, 81° 40.532′ W. Marker is in Washington, West Virginia, in Wood County. Marker is on Dupont Road (West Virginia Route 892) west of Meldahl Rd (County Route 36), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington WV 26181, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Prehistoric Sites (approx. 3½ miles away); Cedarville Cemetery (approx. 4.6 miles away in Ohio); Putnam Family Library / Belpre Farmers' Library (approx. 4.7 miles away in Ohio); Early Ohio Artists (approx. 4.9 miles away in Ohio); Devol's Floating Mill (approx. 5 miles away in Ohio); Belpre and the Ohio River (approx. 5 miles away in Ohio); Belpre Veterans Memorial (approx. 5.1 miles away in Ohio); Bathsheba Rouse (approx. 5.1 miles away in Ohio).
 
Also see . . .  History of Washington Bottom. First published in 1932. “Opposite to this creek [Washington] saw a bottom of ‘exceeding
Washington Bottom Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 28, 2018
2. Washington Bottom Marker
good land’ and thought there might be two or three thousand acres of bottom and flat land together also that the lower end of the bottom is opposite to a small island of which little could be seen when the river was high. This island is Newbury. Since Washington first saw it the floods in the Ohio have surged over Newbury for more than one hundred and fifty years and it is still a small uncultivated island. He returned up the river from the Great Kanawha on November 8, left the canoe, and went afoot for the most of the day, and was making a close examination of the land both below and above the mouth of the Little Kanawha. He thought Washington Bottom was about seven miles long and very valuable if not liable to overflow, as some parts of it seemed to be low. He saw that the upper end of this bottom began at just such another place as the lower side. Up to date, 1932, no flood has reached any of the houses on Washington Bottom.” (Submitted on October 7, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Washington Bottom Log House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 28, 2018
3. Washington Bottom Log House
Across the street from the Washington Bottom Volunteer Fire Department. In view from this marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 7, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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