Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Pierre in Stanley County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Pierre Chouteau: Military Occupancy (1855-1857)

 
 
Fort Pierre Chouteau: Military Occupancy (1855-1857) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 19, 2016
1. Fort Pierre Chouteau: Military Occupancy (1855-1857) Marker
Inscription. Fort Pierre Chouteau's two-year stint as a military fort started in 1855. The Black Hills Gold Rush brought white travelers into lands occupied by American Indians, increasing tensions. The U.S. Army set up forts to protect travelers. Fort Pierre Chouteau became the first military fort in the Upper Missouri region.

More than 900 soldiers called Fort Pierre Chouteau home during its military time, more than the fort and surrounding area could support. The army housed men in portable clapboard houses and sent some to smaller winter camps. The fort was abandoned in 1857. The army moved building materials and weapons south to Fort Randall near Pickstown, SD.

General William S. Harney and his troops arrived at Fort Pierre in October 1855. The next year, 7,000 representatives from the Brute, Oglala, Two Kettle, Minneconjou, Sans Arc, Hunkpapa, Blackfeet, Yank-tonais, and Yankton Sioux tribes met at the fort and signed the Treaty of Fort Pierre. The treaty allowed tribes to police themselves and permitted white travel along the North Platte River. The government promised to send food to the tribes and help any member interested in farming. Congress never ratified the treaty.

Sponsored by the South Dakota State Historical Society; a Preserve America grant and the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad
Marker detail: Major Dakota Army Posts image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Major Dakota Army Posts
Corporation.
Images courtesy of the South Dakota Historical Society and the National Archives.

 
Erected by The South Dakota State Historical Society, a Preserve America grant and the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad Corporation.
 
Location. 44° 23.455′ N, 100° 23.266′ W. Marker is in Fort Pierre, South Dakota, in Stanley County. Marker can be reached from Fort Chouteau Road 0.3 miles east of State Highway 1806 when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located on the grounds of the Fort Pierre Chouteau National Historic Landmark, at the northeast end of the walking trail from Fort Chouteau Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 350 Fort Chouteau Road, Fort Pierre SD 57532, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Archaeology at Fort Pierre Chouteau (here, next to this marker); Fort Pierre Chouteau Site (here, next to this marker); Fort Pierre Choteau Trading Post (here, next to this marker); Cultures Come Together (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Pierre Chouteau: Fur Trade (1832-1855) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line);
Marker detail: General William S. Harney image. Click for full size.
National Archives
3. Marker detail: General William S. Harney
General William S. Harney was one of the first army officers to campaign in the Northern Great Plains.
Fur Trade on the Upper Missouri River (about 500 feet away); Fort Pierre Chouteau (about 600 feet away); John C. Waldron (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Pierre.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high metal posts.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Fort Pierre Chouteau National Historic Landmark
 
Also see . . .  General William S. Harney on the Northern Plains. The Department of War purchased the Fort Pierre Chouteau from the American Fur Company for use as a northern bastion in Harney's Sioux expedition. In June, the Second Infantry had taken supplies for fifteen hundred men and embarked on steamboats headed for this upper Missouri site. Even though it was inadequate, Fort Pierre Chouteau was now the headquarters of the Sioux expedition and, as such, was the center of operations for fourteen companies, six from the Second Infantry, four from the Sixth Infantry, and four from the Second Dragoons. As a result of the poor conditions at the fort, however, Harney ordered most of his men to winter at temporary cantonments north and south of Fort Pierre Chouteau where they could find adequate grass and wood. (Submitted on October 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: Fort Pierre Chouteau watercolors image. Click for full size.
By Gilcrease
4. Marker detail: Fort Pierre Chouteau watercolors
Army Lieutenant and painter Alfred Sully painted these watercolors. Fort Pierre looking south (left), Fort Pierre 1857, the last recorded interpretation of the fort (middle), and an interior view of Fort Pierre Chouteau (right).
 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Fort Pierre Chouteau: Military Occupancy (1855-1857) Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 19, 2016
5. Fort Pierre Chouteau: Military Occupancy (1855-1857) Marker (wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 19 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement