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Whipholt in Cass County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Sugar Point Battle

 
 
Sugar Point Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2003
1. Sugar Point Battle Marker
Inscription. When a federal marshal with about 100 troops of the 3rd Infantry tried to arrest the Chippewa Chief Bugonaygeshig at Sugar Point opposite here on the northeast shore of the lake, a sharp fight occurred October 5, 1898. The whites lost 7 killed and 16 wounded and the arrest was never accomplished.
 
Erected by Minnesota Historical Society & State of Minnesota Department of Highways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 47° 3.005′ N, 94° 21.426′ W. Marker is in Whipholt, Minnesota, in Cass County. Marker is on State Highway 200 0.3 miles east of County Route 165, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located at a roadside stop on Whipholt Beach Road (Maple Leaf Drive) on the north side of Minnesota Hwy 200. Marker is in this post office area: Walker MN 56484, United States of America.
 
More about this marker. The marker is a large and well-weathered metal plaque atop a stonework pedestal. It overlooks Leech Lake to the north.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Sugar Point. The Battle of Sugar Point, or the Battle of Leech Lake, was fought on October 5, 1898 between
Sugar Point Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 3, 2003
2. Sugar Point Battle Marker
Looking north across Leech Lake toward the battle site on the opposite side.
the 3rd U.S. Infantry and members of the Pillager Band of Chippewa Indians in a failed attempt to apprehend Pillager Ojibwe Bugonaygeshig ("Old Bug" or "Hole-In-The-Day"), as the result of a dispute with Indian Service officials on the Leech Lake Reservation in Cass County, Minnesota. Often referred to as "the last Indian Uprising in the United States", the engagement was also the first battle to be fought in the area of the United States known as the Old Northwest since the Black Hawk War in 1832. It is sometimes considered to be the last battle fought between Native Americans and the U.S. Army. (Submitted on October 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Battle of Sugar Point. The 1898 Battle of Sugar Point is generally agreed to be the last battle between the United States and Native American tribes. The battle was small and quick. Still, it is sobering to think a battle between the United States and members of a sovereign nation occurred on this peaceful lake within the lifetime of your great grandparents. (Submitted on October 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. The Battle of Sugar Point. In the late 19th century, tensions were high between many Ojibwe in northern Minnesota and the government, including conflicts over logging on reservations. Timber companies often violated the law, taking more trees than allowed and were late with tribal payments for the wood. On Sept. 25, 1898, less than two weeks before the Battle of Sugar Point, several Ojibwe leaders petitioned President William McKinley, writing, “We now have only the pine lands of our reservations for our future subsistence and support, but the manner in which we are being defrauded out of these has alarmed us.” (Submitted on October 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2012, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 936 times since then and 92 times this year. Last updated on October 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 26, 2012, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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