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Fort Indiantown Gap in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

M60A3 Patton Tank

 
 
M60A3 Patton Tank Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
1. M60A3 Patton Tank Marker
Inscription.

This M60A3 Main Battle Tank (MBT) is a fully tracked, armored, combat vehicle operated by a crew of four consisting of a driver, gunner, loader, and a tank commander. The vehicle is powered by a 750 horsepower V-12 air cooled compression ignition diesel engine. It has a 105mm main gun system, and carries 63 rounds for the main gun on board. The vehicle is further equipped with a deep water fording kit.

The tank's suspension system, with six road wheels per side, is torsion bar sprung. The main armament, is a 105mm M68 rifled gun and is mounted on a 360-degree turret. Secondary armament included an M85 (12.7mm) .50 caliber machine gun on the commander's cupola, co-axial 7.62 M240 machine gun and an M239 smoke grenade launcher. The M60 Patton is equipped with night vision periscopes. The MBT basic statistics are:

Entered service: 1960 (A3 version in 1978)
Builder: Chrysler Defense System
Weight: 54 tons
Crew: 4
Length: 9.43 Meters (30.93 feet)
Width: 3.63 Meters (11.90 feet)
Height: 3.27 Meters (10.72 feet)
Horsepower: 750 hp
Engine: Continental AVDS-1790-2C, 12 cylinder reciprocating diesel engine.
Max Speed: 48km/h (30 miles per hour)
Range: 482 km (300 miles)
Weapon System: Combat load of the M60A3 contains 63 rounds of 105mm, 6,000 rounds of 7.62mm caliber machine gun,

M60A3 Tank and Former Marker In Original Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 20, 2008
2. M60A3 Tank and Former Marker In Original Location
940 rounds of .50 caliber machine gun ammunition.

[Former Marker Text]
This M60A3 Main Battle Tank (MBT) is a fully tracked, armored, combat vehicle operated by a crew of four consisting of a driver, gunner, loader, and a tank commander. The vehicle is powered by a 750 horsepower V-12 air cooled compression ignition diesel engine. It has a 105mm main gun system and carries 63 rounds for the main gun on board. The vehicle is further equipped with a deep water fording kit.

The tank's suspension system, with six road wheels per side, is torsion bar sprung. The main armament, the 105mm gun, is mounted on a 360-degree turret. Secondary armament included a .50 caliber machine gun in the commander's cupola. There is a coaxially mounted 7.62mm machine gun, and a M-239 smoke grenade launcher. The M-60 Tank is equipped with three night vision periscopes. The basic statistics of the M-60 MBT are as follows:

Builder: Chrysler Defense Systems
Length: 27 feet
Width: 12 feet
Height: 11 feet
Weight: 54 tons
Cost: $872,745 in 1993
Speed: 30 miles per hour
Range: 240 miles
Magazines: 63 rounds of 105mm; 6,000 rounds of 7.62mm machine gun; 940 rounds of .50 machine gun ammunition.
 
Erected by Pennsylvania National Guard Military Museum.
 
Location. 40° 

Business End of the M-60 (at it's original location) image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 20, 2008
3. Business End of the M-60 (at it's original location)
The main gun extends out from a mantlet on the turret, forming a "shield" over the front. The sighting optics and the coaxial machine gun also stick out of the mantlet. The commander's .50 caliber machine gun is mounted on a smaller cupola turret on top. Below the main gun turret are the periscopes of the driver's position.
25.957′ N, 76° 34.126′ W. Marker is in Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, in Lebanon County. Marker is at the intersection of Fisher Avenue and Clement Avenue/Wiley Road, on the left when traveling east on Fisher Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Annville PA 17003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. M46 Patton Tank (a few steps from this marker); M113A2 APC (a few steps from this marker); Company G, 112th Infantry, and Service Troop, 104th Cavalry, War Memorial (a few steps from this marker); M1/IPM1 Abrams Tank (a few steps from this marker); M4A3 Sherman Tank (a few steps from this marker); Third Armored Division (within shouting distance of this marker); Clyde Grubb Lester Baver (within shouting distance of this marker); Frank Smolik Bob Pacios (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Indiantown Gap.
 
More about this marker. The M60A3 and marker were formerly located on the front lawn of the Pennsylvania National Guard Headquarters, 40.42971525N 76.57206237W.
 
Also see . . .
1. The M-60A3 MBT. The M-60 was the mainstay of the U.S. Army's armored units for much of the 1970s and 1980s. Its long service continued through Desert Storm. The M-60A3 was technically
M60A3 Patton Tank and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
4. M60A3 Patton Tank and Marker
At its new location
an upgrade of earlier models, with improved ballistic computers, thermal sights, and laser rangefinder. (Submitted on October 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. M60 Series Main Battle Tank. (Submitted on January 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. M60 Patton. (Submitted on January 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. War, ColdWar, VietnamWars, Non-US
 
M60A3 Patton Tank image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2017
5. M60A3 Patton Tank
Former M60A3 MBT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 20, 2008
6. Former M60A3 MBT Marker
This was the original marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,881 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2, 3. submitted on October 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on January 31, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   6. submitted on October 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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