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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Huntington in Cabell County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Huntington Mine Rescue Car

 
 
Huntington Mine Rescue Car Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
1. Huntington Mine Rescue Car Marker
Inscription. One of the original 7 US Bureau of Mines train cars was headquartered near C&O tracks, 1911–1933. The wooden car, with crew & supplies, traveled the WV region to give mine safety & rescue training and to aid in mine disaster rescue efforts. Government rescue cars reflected Progressive Era trends of humanitarianism and efficiency in national reform programs.
 
Erected 2014 by The Royce J. and Caroline B. Watts Museum and West Virginia Archives & History.
 
Location. 38° 25.004′ N, 82° 26.511′ W. Marker is in Huntington, West Virginia, in Cabell County. Marker is on 7th Avenue west of 10th Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. It is at the former C&O Railroad Station, now a CSX Transportation office building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 935 7th Ave, Huntington WV 25701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Virginia State Road (approx. ¼ mile away); Huntington (approx. ¼ mile away); War of 1812 Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); James River Company (approx. 0.4 miles away); Blues & Gospel Singer (approx. half
Huntington Mine Rescue Car Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
2. Huntington Mine Rescue Car Marker
It is streetside on the plaza in front of the former C&O Railroad station, now a CSX Transportation office building.
a mile away); B&O Railroad Depot / Heritage Village (approx. half a mile away); Elk River Coal & Lumber Company #10 Steam Locomotive (approx. half a mile away); Lavinia Norman, Founder (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntington.
 
Also see . . .  Mine Rescue Cars and Stations. Car No. 7 was stationed in Huntington, W. Va. “Stations and cars were equipped both with mine-rescue and first-aid equipment, much of which is the beginning came from England and Germany. The railroad cars were former Pullman sleeping cars purchased by the Government. Interiors were remodeled to include an office, training and workroom, and cooking, eating, and sleeping quarters. Each station or car was directed by a mining engineer of practical miner trained in rescue- and first-aid methods. Personnel of Car No. 8 included a mine surgeon in 1914, and later Public Health surgeons were assigned to most cars.” (Submitted on November 7, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Statue of Collis P. Huntington at the former C&O Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
1924 bronze by Gutzon Borglum, Photograph by J.J. Prats, September 29, 2018
3. Statue of Collis P. Huntington at the former C&O Railroad Station
Statue is 8 feet tall on a 46 inch base. Huntington was the founder of Huntington in West Virginia and builder of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. The interpretive panel in front of the statue is weather-worn and can no longer be read.
A Wooden Mine Rescue Car from 1907 image. Click for full size.
By Unknown photographer. U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration Photograph
4. A Wooden Mine Rescue Car from 1907
Secretary of the Interior, Richard A. Ballinger; Director of the Bureau of Mines, Dr. Joseph A. Holmes; Dr. J. J. Rutledge and two others; with a Bureau of Mines rescue car in the background at Marianna, Pa.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 7, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 7, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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