Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brooklyn in Kings County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Artillery of the American Revolution

 
 
Artillery of the American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
1. Artillery of the American Revolution Marker
Complete with errors of spelling, grammar, style and fact.
Inscription.  There are three basic type of artillery used in the Revolution: Cannon or Guns, Mortars and Howitzers.

Cannon or Guns


These were the most commonly used and were typically made in Spain, France or England. They were cast in one piece of metal and then the barrel tube was drilled out. Cannon were refferred to by the weight of the round shot it ould fire; the most common were the 3 and 6 pounder. They were made from bronze or iron and ranged in size from the smaller bore swivel cannon to the large iron 24 pound siege guns. Iron cannon could withstand a larger charge and therefore had a longer range; bronze cannon were lighter weight and more mobile. The cannon at Fort Putnam is a replica of a British brone 2 pound “grasshopper” cannon mounted on a field carriage which was considered very light and mobile for its time.

Howitzers
Howitzers could fire in high trajectories like mortars and because of their shorter barrel length, could fire larger projectiles more directly like cannon. These siege artillery used solid shot ranging from 32 pounds to the rare 200 pound ball projectiles
Artillery of the American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
2. Artillery of the American Revolution Marker
The marker is within the "Fort Putnam" redoubt display.
to wear away earthworks and fortifications. (sic)

Mortars
Mortars were shorter barrel artillery designed to fire at a high 45 degree trajectory over the wall of a redoubt or fort, also known as firing en barbette. These were also bronze or iron and ranged in calibre or bore diameter from 4.4 inches to the 15 inch Royal Mortar which could fire a projectile ovefr 1,000 yards. Mortars were mounted on a stationary boulk and were used in siege warfare when surrounding a fort or were fired from barges know as bomb ketches when landing troops ashore.

Firing Artillery
A crew of 3 to 5 manned a single artillery piece and used the following steps:
The mop would be dipped in a bucket and rammed down the bore to extinguished any embers from the last firing
A charge of gunpowder usually wrapped in paper or cloth was pushed down the bore with the ram.
A quoin or wooden wedge was used to set the elevation of the cannon.
A priming pin was pushed through the tough hole to clear it and pierce the powder wrapping. A quick match (usually a goose quill filled with powder) was inserted into the touch hole as a fuse.
A slow match (also called a botefeux) or slow burning rope on a stick was waved in the air to create a glow; it was touched to the quick match at the “fire” command.

Women in Artillery
Margaret
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
3. Inset
"Ships swivel guns were oftern used in field mounted on stumps"
Ludwig Hayes also known as “Molly Pitcher” took her husband’s place on the gun crew for the duration of the battle when he was killed in Monmouth, N.J.

 
Location. 40° 41.531′ N, 73° 58.477′ W. Marker is in Brooklyn, New York, in Kings County. Marker can be reached from Washington Park. The marker is within the redoubt display by the Fort Greene Park Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brooklyn NY 11205, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Artillery Projectiles of the American Revolution (here, next to this marker); African American Heroes of the American Revolution (here, next to this marker); What is a redoubt anyway? (here, next to this marker); Fort Greene Park (a few steps from this marker); Prison Ship Martyrs Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Greene Historic District (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fowler (approx. 0.4 miles away); Bldg 92 (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brooklyn.
 
Regarding Artillery of the American Revolution. "Molly Pitcher" is buried at the Old Graveyard in Carlisle, PA. Click on the "Related marker" link below.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories.
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
4. Inset
"3 pound bronze cannon"
War, US Revolutionary
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
5. Inset
"2 pounder "grasshopper" cannon"
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
6. Inset
"3 pound field cannon"
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
7. Inset
6 pounder field carriage
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
8. Inset
12 pounder mounted on ship's carriage
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
9. Inset
24 pounder siege cannon
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
10. Inset
Howitzers
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
11. Inset
Mortars
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
12. Inset
Artillerists' tools - (ieft to right) mop, ram, ladle, worm
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 6, 2018
13. Inset
Revolutionary War artillery re-enactors with a 2-pounder "grasshopper" piece.
 

More. Search the internet for Artillery of the American Revolution.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 31, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 20, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 20, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   7, 8, 9. submitted on November 26, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   10, 11, 12. submitted on December 11, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   13. submitted on December 30, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement