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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Morris-Jumel Mansion

 
 
Morris-Jumel Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2008
1. Morris-Jumel Mansion Marker
Inscription. This Georgian country seat was built by Colonel Roger Morris in 1765. Colonel Morris, a Loyalist, left the house when he returned to England at the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. From September 14 through October 18, 1776, the house was used as General George Washington’s headquarters during the Battle of Harlem Heights. Stephen Jumel, a wealthy Frenchman, purchased it in 1810, and after his death in 1832, Madame Jumel became the wife of Aaron Burr. In 1903, the City of New York bought the mansion for restoration by the Washington Headquarters Association. It is now a museum.
 
Erected 1936 by New York Department of Parks and Recreation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the George Washington Slept Here, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 40° 50.07′ N, 73° 56.332′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Jumel Terrace and Sylvan Terrace, on the right when traveling north on Jumel Terrace. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 65 Jumel Terrace, New York NY 10032, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Morris-Jumel Mansion (here, next to this marker); The John T. Brush Stairway
Marker on Jumel Terrace image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2008
2. Marker on Jumel Terrace
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Polo Grounds (approx. ¼ mile away); Middle Redoubt of the American Army   1776 (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Main Line of Defences (approx. half a mile away); Site of Hilltop Park (approx. half a mile away); The First Line of Defence (approx. 0.7 miles away); Joseph Paul Dimaggio (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Morris-Jumel Mansion. (Submitted on October 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Battle of Harlem Heights, September 16, 1776 at Harlem, New York. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on October 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Battle of Harlem Heights 1776. A British perspective of the battle from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on October 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Morris-Jumel Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2008
3. Morris-Jumel Mansion
The Continental Army took possession of this mansion in the fall of 1776. General Washington made it his headquarters during the Battle of Harlem Heights. After Washington's retreat from New York, the mansion was used by the British and Hessian troops.
Morris-Jumel Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2008
4. Morris-Jumel Mansion
Washington returned to this mansion during his presidency. In the summer of 1790, he dined here with Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Henry Knox.
Morris-Jumel Mansion - National Historic Landmark image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2008
5. Morris-Jumel Mansion - National Historic Landmark
Morris-Jumel Mansion
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark
Under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935
this site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating and illustrating
the history of the United States

U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1962
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,208 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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