Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Natchez in Adams County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Intersection of Jefferson and North Rankin streets

Natchez Trails

 
 
Intersection of Jefferson and North Rankin streets Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2014
1. Intersection of Jefferson and North Rankin streets Marker
Inscription.
Zion Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church was built in 1858 as the Second Presbyterian Church, a mission of First Presbyterian Church. Zion Chapel acquired the building in 1866, when Hiram R. Revels served as pastor. The election of Revels in 1870 to the United States Senate marked the first time that an African American served in either house of the U.S. Congress.

Hiram Revels was born free in North Carolina in 1827. As a young man, he worked as a barber before studying to become a minister at seminaries in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. During the Civil War, he recruited black Union regiments in Maryland and Missouri. After his arrival at Zion Chapel A.M.E. Church, he was elected to the City Council, and then to the Mississippi State Senate. After serving in the U.S. Senate 1870-1871, he became the first President of Alcorn Agricultural & Mechanical College (now Alcorn State University).

Richard King built King's Tavern about 1797 and received his first tavern license in 1799. Boatmen who floated down the Mississippi River to sell their flatboats of enslaved persons and produce frequently stopped in at the tavern on their return from New Orleans. They then headed north by foot on the Natchez Trace. Pony Express riders, who carried mail on the Natchez Trace,
Marker detail: Hiram Revels image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Hiram Revels
The election of Revels in 1870 to the United States Senate marked the first time that an African American served in either house of the U.S. Congress.
also used the building as a mail station.

In 1848, the parish at St. Mary Cathedral started the St. Mary's Orphan Asylum for girls (no longer standing). In 1860, the church also started D'Evereux Hall, an orphanage for boys on the outskirts of downtown. In 1966, the Church closed both orphanages and demolished the buildings. The Church sold the girls' orphanage property to Zion Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church for use as a parking lot.

In the foreground of this photograph is the G. L. C. Davis House. Superintendent of the National Telegraph line, Davis sold his home in 1858 when he resigned his position and moved to New Orleans. The for-sale advertisement described it as “the eligibly situated and new built brick house [with] a fine garden and orchard of fruit trees attached.”
 
Erected by City of Natchez, Mississippi.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trails marker series.
 
Location. 31° 33.606′ N, 91° 23.94′ W. Marker is in Natchez, Mississippi, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of North Rankin Street and Jefferson Street, on the right when traveling south on North Rankin Street. Touch for map. Marker is located along the sidewalk,
Marker detail: St. Mary's Orphan Asylum for Girls<br>(<i>no longer standing</i>) image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: St. Mary's Orphan Asylum for Girls
(no longer standing)
at the northeast corner of the intersection. Marker is at or near this postal address: 619 Jefferson Street, Natchez MS 39120, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. King's Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Intersection of High and North Rankin streets (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Zion Chapel A.M.E. Church (about 300 feet away); 300 Block of Martin Luther King Street (about 400 feet away); Jefferson Street Methodist Church (about 400 feet away); Intersection of Jefferson and North Union streets (about 400 feet away); Zion Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church (about 400 feet away); Churches in the St. Catherine Street Neighborhood (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Natchez.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large, rectangular composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high metal posts.
 
Also see . . .  Hiram Rhodes Revels. Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress. With his moderate political orientation and oratorical skills honed from years as a preacher, Revels filled a vacant seat in the United States Senate in 1870. Just before the Senate agreed
Marker detail: G. L. C. Davis House image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: G. L. C. Davis House
to admit a black man to its ranks on February 25, Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality..." (Submitted on December 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & ReligionNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Zion Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church (<i>located 1 block east of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2014
5. Zion Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church (located 1 block east of marker)
King's Tavern (<i>view from near marker; looking west along Jefferson Street</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 22, 2014
6. King's Tavern (view from near marker; looking west along Jefferson Street)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.