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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Homer in Licking County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin / First Woman Candidate for President of the United States

 
 
Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 17, 2008
1. Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin Marker
Inscription.
Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin
Born in Homer in 1838, Victoria Claflin proved to be a woman with visions that exceeded her time. Victoria and her sister Tennessee, in 1870, became the first women stockbrokers in the country. Her opinions expressed in the Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly newspaper led her to become the first woman invited to address Congress.

First Woman Candidate for President of the United States
Because of her unrelenting advocacy of women's suffrage, Victoria Woodhull was nominated to run for president by the "Equal Rights" party in 1872. Her life was a continual campaign to fight for woman's suffrage, civil rights, and child labor reform laws. In 1879, Victoria married John Martin and lived her remaining years in British Society. She died in England in 1927.
 
Erected 1988 by Scott and Michele Claflin, Licking County Historical Society, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 5-45.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 15.132′ N, 82° 31.527′ W. Marker is in Homer, Ohio, in Licking County. Marker is at the intersection
First Woman Candidate for President of the United States Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 17, 2008
2. First Woman Candidate for President of the United States Marker
of Homer Road and South Street, on the left when traveling west on Homer Road. Touch for map. Marker is in front of the Homer Public Library. Marker is in this post office area: Homer OH 43027, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Major General William Starke Rosecrans / Bishop Sylvester Horton Rosecrans ( here, next to this marker); Homer Veterans Memorial ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Hufford House ( approx. 4 miles away); Brandon World War II Honor Roll ( approx. 4.1 miles away); Ice Harvesting ( approx. 5.1 miles away); "Ye Olde Mill" ( approx. 5.1 miles away); Lakeholm Administration Building ( approx. 8.7 miles away); Little Indian Fields ( approx. 9.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Homer.
 
Additional comments.
1. Adena Mound in immediate vicinity
To the south and east of this historical marker, on private property, sits a prehistoric earthen mound about 15 feet high, made by the Adena culture. In the early 20th century, William C. Mills of the Ohio Historical Society considered this to be one of the most important conical mounds in the North Fork valley, according the Indian Mounds of the Middle Ohio Valley. That it remains in any condition is significant, as
Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin and Rosecrans Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 17, 2008
3. Victoria Claflin-Woodhull-Martin and Rosecrans Markers
Across from the Homer Cemetery.
so many of these structures were destroyed by agriculture and construction.

This mound is known as the the Dixon Mound, but has also been known as the Williamson Mound.
    — Submitted March 30, 2009, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.

 
Categories. Civil RightsIndustry & CommerceNotable PersonsPoliticsWomen
 
Location of the Adena mound relative to the library image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck
4. Location of the Adena mound relative to the library
Dixon Mound (also known as the Williamson Mound) image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck
5. Dixon Mound (also known as the Williamson Mound)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 20, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 3,212 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 20, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4, 5. submitted on March 30, 2009, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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