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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Great Falls in Cascade County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

These Springs Have Witnessed...

 
 
These Springs Have Witnessed... Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
1. These Springs Have Witnessed... Marker
Inscription.  Native American tribes followed the buffalo through this area and camped at Giant Springs. The temperature of the spring water stays a consistent 54 degrees all year long, making this a good site for winter camps.

Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery expedition member Captain William Clark first documented these springs on June 18, 1805. The Giant Springs area was one of many where the Corps reported plentiful beaver. Many trappers and fur traders eventually traveled through this area during the Fur Trade Era, which flourished along the Missouri River in the 1800's.

Nearly eighty-five years after William Clark’s discovery of the springs, completion of the Montana Smelter in 1888, located just south of present day Giant Springs Road, gave Great Falls its first major industry. Tice smelter overlooked Giant Springs and operated until 1902.

The Giant Springs Fish Hatchery was completed in 1922 and became an added attraction for the visitors to Giant Springs Park. The park was operated at the time by the City of Great Falls.

Giant Springs Park prospered during the Great Depression of the 1930’s as the result of major
These Springs Have Witnessed... Marker (<i>wide view; Giant Springs & Missouri River background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
2. These Springs Have Witnessed... Marker (wide view; Giant Springs & Missouri River background)
reconstruction projects. The Works Project Administration (WPA) and other local agencies built the concrete bridges, viewing platform, stone steps, and early roads. Workers also rehabilitated the rock walls and planted many of the large trees seen in the park today.

In 1970 Giant Springs Park was transferred from the City of Great Falls to the State of Montana and became Giant Springs State Park.
 
Erected by Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 47° 32.067′ N, 111° 13.792′ W. Marker is in Great Falls, Montana, in Cascade County. Marker can be reached from Giant Springs Road 1.3 miles north of River Drive North, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in Giant Springs State Park, along the Giant Springs interpretive trail, overlooking Giant Springs, the Roe River, and the Missouri River. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4803 Giant Springs Road, Great Falls MT 59405, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Where Does the Water Come From? (here, next to this marker); Pure Springs Along the Missouri River (a few steps from this marker); The Smallest River Runs Through It
Roe River flowing toward the Missouri River (<i>view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
3. Roe River flowing toward the Missouri River (view from marker)
(within shouting distance of this marker); A "great" Set of Falls (approx. 0.4 miles away); Cascade County Courthouse (approx. 3.8 miles away); The Portage Around the Falls (approx. 4.6 miles away); The Falls: Obstacle or Opportunity (approx. 4.6 miles away); Commissary of the Plains (approx. 4.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Great Falls.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Also see . . .
1. Roe River. The Roe River runs from Giant Springs to the Missouri River near Great Falls, Montana, United States. The Roe River is only 201 feet long at its longest constant point, and had been named as the World's Shortest River by the Guinness book of World Records before Guinness eliminated the shortest river category. Towards its mouth, the Roe is about 6–8 feet deep. (Submitted on December 26, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Giant Springs State Park. Giant Springs was discovered by the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1805 and is one of the largest freshwater springs in the country. The springs flow at a rate of 156 million gallons of water per day and the water
Giant Springs (<i>Missouri River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
4. Giant Springs (Missouri River in background)
stays at a temperature of 54 degrees. This is also the site of the Roe River, once listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's shortest river. (Submitted on December 26, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Giant Springs - One of the largest fresh water springs in the world!. Native Americans revered it, directly connecting it to a Blackfeet Indian Sun god. Lewis and Clark stumbled into it while portaging around the "Great Fall" of the Missouri. (Submitted on December 26, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Giant Springs. This remarkable attraction was known during the 1880s and 90s as "Big Spring," and sometimes "Wonderful Spring." In 1887 a daring group of eastern tourists steamed thirty miles up the river from Fort Benton to see the falls and the spring. Of the latter, the reporter wrote: "This tremendous outpouring seems to be rather the mouth of a hidden river than a simple spring. They agreed to christen it "The Giant's Fountain." (Submitted on December 26, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansParks & Recreational AreasWaterways & Vessels
 
Giant Springs image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
5. Giant Springs
Giant Springs cascading into the Missouri River image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 10, 2015
6. Giant Springs cascading into the Missouri River
 
More. Search the internet for These Springs Have Witnessed....
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 49 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 26, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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