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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Belvoir in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse

 
 
Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
1. Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse Marker
Inscription. The Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse was built from 1851 – 1853 by members of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) who in 1846 purchased the 2,000 acre Woodlawn tract as the means to “establish a free-labor colony in a slave state” (Journal of Chalkley Gillingham founding member of Woodlawn Quaker Settlement).

They left homes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, where nearby Underground Railroad routes made clear the human cost of slavery and its violation of Friends’ principles of equality and non-violence.

Seeking to uphold Quaker belief there is “that of God” in everyone, the settlement’s spiritual leaders envisioned a community of small farms operating without slave labor as an alternative to Virginia’s plantation culture.

The Quakers’ agricultural practices and employment of free labor succeeded. Their farms, mills, schools, and this meetinghouse established a thriving community, shared with free black landowners and like-minded Abolitionists such as the Woodlawn Baptists.

Throughout the Civil War, Friends continued to worship in this meeting house, even when Union Troops occupied it.

The community remained into the 20th century, guided by Friends’ principles of peace and community service. However, with World War I, the United States
Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
2. Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse Marker
Army began to absorb Woodlawn’s farmland, eventually creating Fort Belvoir. This “Quaker Plain Style” meetinghouse today continues as an active place of worship, home of the Alexandria Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends.
 
Location. 38° 42.849′ N, 77° 8.463′ W. Marker is in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker is on Woodlawn Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8990 Woodlawn Road, Fort Belvoir VA 22060, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Woodlawn Historic District (here, next to this marker); Belvoir (approx. ¼ mile away); Fort Belvoir (approx. ¼ mile away); Woodlawn Historic Landscapes (approx. half a mile away); Woodlawn (approx. 0.6 miles away); George Washington's Gristmill (approx. 0.6 miles away); Doeg Indians (approx. 0.6 miles away); Pohick Road Crossing (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Belvoir.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers
 
Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, 1968 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
3. Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, 1968
Close-up of photo on marker
Interior of Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, 2008 image. Click for full size.
2008
4. Interior of Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, 2008
Close-up of photo on marker
Woodlawn Community image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
5. Woodlawn Community
This 1878 G.M. Hopkins map shows a populated 19th-century Woodlawn community with the Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse, Woodlawn Baptist Church and Woodlawn Mansion at its center.
Close-up of map on marker
Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
6. Woodlawn Quaker Meetinghouse
Woodlawn<br>Quaker Meeting image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 26, 2018
7. Woodlawn
Quaker Meeting
-- Established 1849 --
Religious Society of Friends
Worship each Sunday at 11am
All are Welcome

www.woodlawnfriends.org
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 29, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 26, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on December 27, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 26, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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