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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Silver Star in Madison County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Sheave Wheels from the Speculator Mine

 
 
Sheave Wheels from the Speculator Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2016
1. Sheave Wheels from the Speculator Mine Marker
Inscription. These sheave wheels from the Speculator Mine were used to hoist the bodies of the 168 miners who died in the Granite Mtn. Mine Disaster, June 8, 1917.

It remains the worst metal mining tragedy in U.S. History. The Granite Mtn. shaft was burned out, so rescue was through the Speculator, connected underground.

Photos are welcome – but please stay away from wheels or machinery
 
Location. 45° 41.304′ N, 112° 17.055′ W. Marker is in Silver Star, Montana, in Madison County. Marker is at the intersection of Highway 41 and Ridge Road, on the left when traveling north on Highway 41. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on Ridge Road, just to the west of the highway. Marker is in this post office area: Silver Star MT 59751, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rope Drive Compressor Wheels (within shouting distance of this marker); Lewis & Clark Camped Here (approx. 6.6 miles away); The Jefferson Valley (approx. 6.6 miles away); The Trail of Lewis & Clark (approx. 10.1 miles away); Road Agent Trail (approx. 10.2 miles away); Thompson Park (approx. 14˝ miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large painted
Sheave Wheels from the Speculator Mine Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2016
2. Sheave Wheels from the Speculator Mine Marker (wide view)
wooden panel, mounted above eye-level, between and suspended by the subject sheave wheels.
 
Also see . . .  The Granite Mountain – Speculator Mine Disaster. Just before midnight on June 8, 1917, a fire broke out in the Granite Mountain Mine on the Butte Hill, sending billows of toxic smoke out the main shaft and into the maze of tunnels branching off from it. Within minutes, miners throughout the honeycomb of drifts and stopes realized their danger and frantically sought escape through passageways into other mines. 168 men died in the disaster, which to this date remains the worst hard-rock mining accident in U.S. history. A crew of men was attempting to install an immense electrical cable — 5 inches thick and weighing several tons — as part of a fire alarm system, an upgrade designed to save lives in precisely the kind of crisis the men would soon be in. The weight of the cable proved too much, and when the men lost control of it, it plummeted down the shaft half a mile, snagging and snarling into a tangled mess at the 2,500-foot level. In the days before plastic, electrical cables were insulated with oil-soaked cloth and paper. As one of the workmen climbed over timbers that reached across the yawning abyss of the shaft that extended down another half mile to inspect the damage, his carbide lamp ignited the oil-soaked wrapping of the cable. The highly inflammable insulation on the cable burned
Double-decker Mine Shaft Car (<i>located near marker; for transporting miners in & out of mine</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2016
3. Double-decker Mine Shaft Car (located near marker; for transporting miners in & out of mine)
as fast as a cannon fuse, quickly carrying the blaze throughout the shaft and kindling the massive timbers that lined it. (Submitted on January 9, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. DisastersIndustry & CommerceNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 11, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 8, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 8, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on January 9, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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