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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alamo in Lincoln County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Pahranagat Valley

 
 
Pahranagat Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 15, 2007
1. Pahranagat Valley Marker
Inscription. “The Rolling Stones of Pahranagat,” a hoax article on magnetic currents written in 1862 by Dan deQuille of the Territorial Enterprise, made this valley world famous. Its lakes are filled and its fields are irrigated by three springs, Hiko, Crystal and Ash.

The Crystal Springs area, used as a watering spot and campsite, was a principal stopover on the Mormon Trail alternated route. In the late 1850’s this area was a haven for outlaws who pastured hundreds of head of stolen cattle on its meadows. Although named provisional county seat in 1866, no significant town was built here.

Ore was discovered in 1865 on Mount Irish, and Logan City sprang briefly into existence. A stamp mill was established at Hiko in 1866 to crush the ore, and it became the center of activity for the valley when it became the county seat in 1867. It was the largest community in Lincoln County until local mining decline and Pioche claimed the county seat in 1871.

Alamo, established in 1900, is the valley’s largest present-day settlement. The area now includes several ranches and the Pahranagat Valley National Wildlife Refuge.
 
Erected 1968 by Nevada State Park System, Lincoln County Area Development Committee. (Marker Number 38.)
 
Location.
Close up of State seal on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 1, 2007
2. Close up of State seal on the Marker
37° 21.733′ N, 115° 9.551′ W. Marker is in Alamo, Nevada, in Lincoln County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 93 and First South, on the left when traveling north on U.S. 93. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alamo NV 89001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Crystal Springs (approx. 12.5 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Dan DeQuille and the Rolling Stones!. Brief essay by Bob Wynn. (Submitted on June 27, 2007.) 

2. New Amended Text for Marker. The Nevada State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) recently updated the text of the roughly 260 state historical markers in Nevada. The Nevada SHPO placed the amended text of each individual marker on its website and will change the actual markers in the field as funding allows. Minor changes have been made to the marker for grammar and readability. The names of the three springs - Hiko, Crystal, and Ash - have been removed from the marker. The link will take you to the Nevada SHPO page for the marker with the amended text. (Submitted on November 12, 2013, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.) 
 
Pahranagat Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 15, 2007
3. Pahranagat Valley Marker
Pahranagat Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2013
4. Pahranagat Valley Marker
View north along US-93 from marker.
Lush Pahranagat Valley in center of photo. image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 15, 2007
5. Lush Pahranagat Valley in center of photo.
Pahranagat Valley image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 1, 2007
6. Pahranagat Valley
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 24, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,234 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 24, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on December 2, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.   3. submitted on June 24, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on October 17, 2013, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   5. submitted on June 24, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on December 2, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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