Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hagerstown Female Seminary

 
 
Hagerstown Female Seminary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
1. Hagerstown Female Seminary Marker
Inscription.  The Hagerstown Female seminary, a women’s college founded by the Evangelical Lutheran Church, opened its doors in 1853. Its name was changed in the 1890s to Kee Mar College, and operated at this location until 1911 when the campus was sold to the Washington County Hospital. Hospital operations moved to this site in 1912 and functioned here for nearly 100 years, until moving to new facilities on Robinwood Drive in 2010-11.

The Campus was frequently occupied by Union and Confederate forces throughout the War. After the Antietam and Gettysburg campaigns of 1862 and 1863, the campus was used as a military hospital for both Federals and Confederates. During the Battle of Hagerstown on July 1863, Battery E, 4th U.S. Artillery deployed here and exchanged cannon fire with Chew’s Battery (Confederate) which was posted near Zion Reformed Church on North Potomac Street.

Col. Samuel Lumpkin, CSA (1833-18 63) commanded the 44th Georgia Infantry when severely wounded in the leg at Gettysburg. The leg was amputated in a field hospital and Lumpkin was transported in a wagon train of wounded to Hagerstown, where he fell into Union hands.
Hagerstown Female Seminary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
2. Hagerstown Female Seminary Marker
Confined at the Hagerstown Female Seminary Hospital, he contracted typhoid fever and died on September 18, 1863. Initially buried in the Presbyterian Church Cemetery on South Potomac Street, he was reinterred 50 years later in Washington Confederate Cemetery.
Steven Stoteforyer

1st. Lt. Samuel Sherer Elder, USA (1826-1885), commanding officer, Battery E, 4th United States Artillery
Library of Congress

Hagerstown as viewed from the heights at Hagerstown Female Seminary.
Washington County Historical Society

Surgeon John M. Gaines, CSA (1837-1915) served in the 8th Virginia Infantry when he was captured while tending to the wounded after the Battle of South Mountain. He was later exchanged, only to be captured again at Williamsport in the retreat from Gettysburg. He was temporarily assigned by his captors to tend to his wounded and ill Confederate prisoners at the Hagerstown Female Seminary Hospital. Exchanged a second time, he served in the rest of the war as a medical officer in the 18th Virginia Infantry. After the war he settled in Boonsboro and in retirement, lived on North Potomac Street in Hagerstown.
Doug Beer

Hagerstown Female Seminary, circa 1860
Washington County Historical Society
 
Location. 39° 38.212′ N, 77° 43.042′ 
Hagerstown Female Seminary, circa 1860 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
3. Hagerstown Female Seminary, circa 1860
Close-up of photo on marker
W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of East Baltimore Street (U.S. Alt 40) and King Street, on the right when traveling west on East Baltimore Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 King Street, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hager Mill (approx. ¼ mile away); Our Journey Transports Us Through Time (approx. 0.3 miles away); Elliott-Bester House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fighting House to House, (approx. 0.3 miles away); Retreat from Gettysburg (approx. 0.3 miles away); Hagerstonians in the Civil War (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Last Confederate Incursion North of the Potomac River (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Hose Company (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
More about this marker. I had trouble with the names I entered as Steven Stoteforyer and Doug Beer.
 
Categories. EducationScience & MedicineWar, US CivilWomen
 
Hagerstown as viewed from the heights at Hagerstown Female Seminary image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
4. Hagerstown as viewed from the heights at Hagerstown Female Seminary
Close-up of photo on marker
Col. Samuel Lumpkin, CSA image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
5. Col. Samuel Lumpkin, CSA
Col. Samuel Lumpkin CSA (1833-1863) commanded the 44th Georgia Infantry when severely wounded in the leg at Gettysburg. The leg was amputated in a field hospital and Lumpkin was transported in a wagon train of wounded to Hagerstown, where he fell into Union hands. Confined at the Hagerstown Female Seminary Hospital, he contracted typhoid fever and died on September 18, 1863. Initially buried in the Presbyterian Church Cemetery on South Potomac Street, he was reinterred 50 years later in Washington Confederate Cemetery.
Close-up of photo on marker
1st Lt. Samuel Sherer Elder, USA image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
6. 1st Lt. Samuel Sherer Elder, USA
1st Lt. Samuel Sherer Elder, USA (1826-1885), commanding officer Battery E, 4th United States Artillery.
Close-up of photo on marker
Surgeon John M. Gaines, CSA image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
7. Surgeon John M. Gaines, CSA
Surgeon John M. Gaines, CSA, (1837-1915) served in the 8th Virginia Infantry when he was captured while tending to the wounded after the Battle of South Mountain. He was later exchanged, only to be captured again at Williamsport in the retreat form Gettysburg. He was temporarily assigned by his captors to tend his wounded and ill fellow Confederate prisoners at Hagerstown Female Seminary Hospital. Exchanged a second time, he served the rest of the war as a medical officer in the 18th Virginia Infantry. After the war he settled in Boonsboro and in retirement lived on North Potomac Street in Hagerstown.
Close-up of photo on marker
 
More. Search the internet for Hagerstown Female Seminary.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Last updated on January 29, 2019, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on January 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on January 29, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.