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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Role in Preserving

Heritage Livestock Breeds

 
 
Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Role in Preserving Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
1. Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Role in Preserving Marker
Inscription. What are Heritage livestock breeds and why are they important?
Heritage livestock breeds are old breeds that were created before the onset of industrial agriculture. Industrialization of agriculture has greatly reduced the number of variety of livestock breeds that remain today. Since 1993, at least 190 different breeds of farm animals have gone extinct. Since 2003 alone, at least 60 breeds of cattle, goats, poultry, horses and pigs have become extinct.

Today there are only a few main breeds that dominate the livestock industries:
• There are only 5 main breeds of dairy cows, with 85% of the market being Holsteins
• 60% of the beef cattle are Angus, Hereford or Simmential breeds
• Only 3 breeds make up the 75% of the hog industry
• Over 60 percent of the sheep come from only four breeds, and 40 percent are Suffolk-breed sheep

Today, the agricultural industry breeds animals for quick production in confined spaces, while Heritage breeds were bred slowly over time and are favored for their hardiness. Heritage breeds are generally better adapted to withstand disease and survive in harsh environmental conditions, and their bodies are better suited for living on pasture lands. It is important to maintain Heritage breeds because of their genetic variety. Genetic variety produces healthier, more adaptive animal
Interpretive Markers at Temple Hall Farm Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
2. Interpretive Markers at Temple Hall Farm Park
populations.

Temple Hall Farm Regional Park's Mission
"The purpose of Temple Hall Farm Regional Park is to preserve the agricultural, cultural and natural resources of the 286-acre farm and to provide an educational resource that explores farming in Loudoun County for the people of Northern Virginia." As such, preserving heritage livestock breeds fits perfectly with our mission.
 
Erected by Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
 
Location. 39° 10.741′ N, 77° 31.712′ W. Marker is near Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is on Temple Hall Lane 0.1 miles north of Limestone School Road (County Route 661), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located in the Temple Hall Farm Regional Park. Marker is in this post office area: Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Creation of Temple Hall Farm Regional Park (here, next to this marker); Temple Hall (here, next to this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 1.7 miles away in Maryland); White’s Ferry (approx. 1.7 miles away in Maryland); Gettysburg Campaign (approx.
Temple Hall Farm Park is a Working Farm image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
3. Temple Hall Farm Park is a Working Farm
1.7 miles away in Maryland); a different marker also named White’s Ferry (approx. 1.8 miles away in Maryland); Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (approx. 1.8 miles away in Maryland); Potomac Crossings (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Leesburg.
 
Also see . . .  Temple Hall Farm Park. Official web site detailing the farm park. The farm includes many family oriented exhibits and activities. (Submitted on October 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
A Heritage Breed Feeds image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 12, 2008
4. A Heritage Breed Feeds
Some of the heritage breeds have rather "sharp" points!
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 852 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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