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New Braunfels in Comal County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

International & Great Northern Railroad in New Braunfels

 
 
International & Great Northern Railroad in New Braunfels Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 16, 2019
1. International & Great Northern Railroad in New Braunfels Marker
Inscription.  As early as 1875, New Braunfels residents began petitioning rail companies to bring lines into the community. The town's first major proposal, to the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railroad, failed to achieve the goal. By the end of the decade, however, the International & Great Northern Railroad (I&GN), which had reached Austin in 1876, agreed to bring rail through New Braunfels. By 1880, the town had a depot and the first trains rolled through. In 1885, the rail company built a new depot, which was replaced by a more modern passenger station in 1907.

The railroad dramatically affected the economy of New Braunfels. With the rail outlet, the town could send goods to market and receive products from other cities more effectively. In addition, the railroad sparked tourism in the area, particularly beginning in the late 1890s. It was during this time that Helen Gould, daughter of railroad financier Jay Gould, visited the town. She proposed that the I&GN build a spur track into a beautiful piece of land owned by Harry Landa, which would become known as Landa Park. I&GN built the spur, and soon the park became a popular tourist destination
1907 International & Great Northern Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 16, 2019
2. 1907 International & Great Northern Railroad Station
Photo was taken standing next to the marker.
in central Texas, drawing visitors by rail. Today, the park remains the city's primary public recreational site.

In 1926, a subsidiary of the Missouri Pacific Railroad bought out the I&GN and by the middle of the 20th century, the railroad's importance decreased. After merging into the Union Pacific Railroad system in 1986, the Missouri Pacific Railroad donated the 1907 I&GN station to the City of New Braunfels. Today, the former station is home to the New Braunfels Railroad Museum.
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13661.)
 
Location. 29° 42.067′ N, 98° 7.591′ W. Marker is in New Braunfels, Texas, in Comal County. Marker is at the intersection of West San Antonio Street and Hill Avenue, on the right when traveling west on West San Antonio Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 302 West San Antonio Street, New Braunfels TX 78130, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Louis Henne Co. (within shouting distance of this marker); Plumeyer Bakery Building (within shouting distance of this marker); New Braunfels 1918 Fire Station (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Spaß und Gemütlichkeit (about 500 feet away); 1915 New Braunfels Post Office
1907 International & Great Northern Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 16, 2019
3. 1907 International & Great Northern Railroad Station
(about 600 feet away); Hinmann House (about 600 feet away); Site of Old Schmitz Hotel (about 800 feet away); Main Plaza Bandstand (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Braunfels.
 
Also see . . .  International-Great Northern Railroad - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on February 20, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 

More. Search the internet for International & Great Northern Railroad in New Braunfels.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 20, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 20, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
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