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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Middleburgh in Schoharie County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bouck's Island

 
 
Bouck's Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, February 23, 2019
1. Bouck's Island Marker
Inscription.  Home of William C. Bouck, born 1786-died 1859. Governor of State of New York, 1842-44.
 
Erected 1939 by State Education Department.
 
Location. 42° 33.567′ N, 74° 24.028′ W. Marker is near Middleburgh, New York, in Schoharie County. Marker is on New York State Route 30, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Just after the bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Middleburgh NY 12122, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Timothy Murphy Trail (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Here Col. John Harper (approx. 0.4 miles away); Indian Trail (approx. 1.3 miles away); The Upper Fort 1777 (approx. 1.6 miles away); Timothy Murphy (approx. 1.6 miles away); a different marker also named Indian Trail (approx. 2 miles away); Vroman's Land (approx. 2.9 miles away); Smoke Generator (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Middleburgh.
 
Regarding Bouck's Island. William Christian Bouck (January 7, 1786 – April 19, 1859) was thirteenth Governor of New York
Bouck's Island image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, February 23, 2019
2. Bouck's Island
from 1842 to 1844. He was the son of Christian and Margaret Bouck. He married Catherine Lawyer (1787–1865) with whom he had eight children.

Bouck first entered politics in 1807, serving as town clerk. From 1808 to 1809 he served as town supervisor. He was Sheriff of Schoharie County from 1812 to 1813. He was a member from Schoharie County of the New York State Assembly from 1814 to 1816 and in 1818. He was a member of the New York State Senate from 1820 to 1822. From 1821 to 1840, he was a member of the Erie Canal Commission.

In November 1840, Bouck ran for Governor of New York on the Democratic ticket with Daniel S. Dickinson, but they were defeated by the Whig incumbents William H. Seward and Luther Bradish. In November 1842, Bouck and Dickinson ran and this time were elected, defeating the Whig candidates Bradish and Gabriel Furman. During his tenure, an anti-rent disagreement in Columbia County was dealt with; and several new appointments were issued. After completing his term, he served as a delegate to the 1846 State Constitutional Convention, the State Board of Regents and as Assistant United States Treasurer.

Congressman Joseph Bouck was his brother. His son Gabriel was the Attorney General of Wisconsin.

The town of Bouckville, in central New York state, is named after him. Bouck Hall at SUNY Cobleskill College in Cobleskill, New York, is also named after him.
 
Also see . . .
1. William Bouck (Wikipedia). (Submitted on February 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
2. Hall of Governors (NYS). (Submitted on February 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
3. National Governors Assoc. (Submitted on February 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
More. Search the internet for Bouck's Island.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 25, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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