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Near Gaffney in Cherokee County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order

 
 
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 25, 2008
1. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
Inscription.
After firing twice, the militia retreated behind the Continentals who were awaiting the British advance in this area. British reinforcements, Fraser's 71st Highlanders, threatened the Continentals' right flank. Lt. Col. Howard ordered his right flank to turn to face them. His center and left flank misunderstood and began an orderly retreat. Sensing victory, the British broke ranks and surged forward. Morgan ordered the Continentals to face about and fire at close range. Raw recruits of the British 7th Regiment panicked and fell back. The Highlanders, still coming on like a mob, were repulsed. The stage was set for entrapment, annihilation, and an American victory.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 35° 7.995′ N, 81° 48.823′ W. Marker is near Gaffney, South Carolina, in Cherokee County. Marker can be reached from Battleground Tour Road (Route 11). Touch for map. Marker is in the Cowpens National Battlefield. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4001 Chesnee Highway, Gaffney SC 29341, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Race for the Grasshopper (within shouting distance of this marker); Double Envelopment (within shouting distance of this marker);
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 12, 2010
2. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
Let 'em Get Within Killin' Distance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Washington Light Infantry Monument (about 300 feet away); Sharpshooters at the Skirmish Line (about 500 feet away); Skirmishers Retreat, British Advance (about 500 feet away); The Continental Army at Cowpens (about 500 feet away); Form the Line of Battle (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Washington Light Infantry Monument (about 600 feet away); The Cavalry (Dragoons) at Cowpens (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gaffney.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Cowpens. The Battle of Cowpens1, January 17, 1781, took place in the latter part of the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution and of the Revolution itself. (Submitted on October 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Cowpens National Battlefield. During the American Revolution, the Battle of Cowpens, January 17, 1781, played an important part in the chain of events that led to the climax of
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 4, 2014
3. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
the war at Yorktown. (Submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John Eager Howard. John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 – October 12, 1827) was an American soldier and politician from Maryland. (Submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Cowpens National Battlefield - John Eager Howard. The Americans and the British met and fought at the Cow Pens, a well-known pasturing area for cattle in the upcountry of South Carolina, on January 17, 1781. (Submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. John Eager Howard (1752 - 1827)
John Eager Howard, (father of Benjamin Chew Howard), a Delegate and a Senator from Maryland; born at ‘Belvedere,’ near Baltimore, Md., June 4, 1752; was instructed by private tutors; served throughout the Revolutionary War, beginning as a captain and holding the rank of colonel when peace was declared; was voted a medal and the thanks of Congress for gallantry at the Battle of Cowpens 1781; Member of the Continental Congress 1788; Governor of Maryland 1789-1791; member, State senate 1791-1795; elected as a Federalist 1796 to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Richard Potts; reelected
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 12, 2010
4. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
on December 9, 1796 and served from November 21, 1796, to March 3, 1803; served as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Sixth Congress; offered the position of Secretary of War by President George Washington, but declined; also declined a commission as brigadier general in the expected war with France in 1798; unsuccessful Federalist candidate for vice president in 1816; died at ’Belvedere,’ near Baltimore, Md., October 12, 1827; interment in Old St. Paul’s Cemetery, Baltimore, Md. (Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.)
    — Submitted July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2010
5. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 12, 2010
6. Colonel Howard's Misunderstood Order Marker
Col. John Edgar Howard<br>June 4, 1752 – October 12, 1827 image. Click for full size.
By Charles Wilson Peale, 1782
7. Col. John Edgar Howard
June 4, 1752 – October 12, 1827
Colonel Howard's image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, circa September 18, 2008
8. Colonel Howard's
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 26, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 977 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 26, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2. submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on September 12, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on August 22, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7. submitted on July 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8. submitted on October 27, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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