Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bandera in Bandera County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Great Western Cattle Trail

 
 
Great Western Cattle Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
1. Great Western Cattle Trail Marker
Inscription.  The Great Western Cattle Trail (also known as the Old Texas Trail and the Dodge City Trail) was the longest of all 19th century trails used to drive cattle from Texas to distant markets. In 1874, Capt. John T. Lytle and other cowboys led 3,500 cattle from south Texas to Fort Robinson, Nebraska. This path became the Great Western Cattle Trail, one of the most frequented routes for driving cattle across the country. Although the trail was less well-known than the Chisholm Trail, the Great Western Cattle Trail carried cattle for longer than all other trails. Over time, more than seven to ten million longhorns, one million horses and 30,000 cowboys used the trail, according to conservative estimates. The Great Western Trail began near Bandera and extended north through Dodge City, Kansas to Ogallala, Nebraska, the Dakotas and into Canada.

Bandera served as an ideal staging and departure point because of its plentiful water and grass for cattle. The cattle market fulfilled the Northeast's high demand for beef, created cattle companies, enterprises and towns along its path and helped revitalize Texas' post-Civil War economy. Between 1855 and
Great Western Cattle Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
2. Great Western Cattle Trail Marker
1890, more than 950 cattle marks and brands were registered in Bandera County. The Great Western Cattle Trail began to lose popularity in 1885, when diseased cattle from Texas prompted many northern states to ban the importation of Texan cattle in warm months, and when increased barbed wire fencing limited cattle drive mobility. The last known drive on the trail occurred when John Rufus Blocker traveled to Deadwood, South Dakota in 1893. In 2004, the Great Western Cattle Trail Association placed its first marker in an effort to place cement markers every six miles along the route.
 
Erected 2014 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17843.)
 
Location. 29° 43.545′ N, 99° 4.352′ W. Marker is in Bandera, Texas, in Bandera County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (State Highway 173/16) and Hackberry Street, on the right when traveling south on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Western Trail Heritage Park. Marker is in this post office area: Bandera TX 78003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bandera, "Cowboy Capital of the World" (here, next to this marker); Bandera, Texas USA (here, next to this marker); Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (within shouting distance of
Map on Sidewalk Showing Route of the Great Western Cattle Trail image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
3. Map on Sidewalk Showing Route of the Great Western Cattle Trail
this marker); Bandera County Courthouse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mormon Settlers in Bandera County (about 300 feet away); Old Texas Ranger Trail (about 400 feet away); Captain Jack Phillips (about 400 feet away); Bandera Historic Town Center (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bandera.
 
Also see . . .  Great Western Trail - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
More. Search the internet for Great Western Cattle Trail.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 26, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.