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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond Hill in Bryan County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Tom Cat

Garrison Mascot

 
 
Tom Cat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
1. Tom Cat Marker
Inscription. The sole Confederate fatality after seven hours of intensive bombardment on March 3, 1863, by the monitors PASSAIC (Capt. Percival Drayton), NAHANT, and PATAPSCO, supported by the MONTAUK, the WISSAHICKON, the SENECA, the DAWN, the FLAMBEAU, the SERBAGO, the C.P. WILLIAMS, the NORFOLK PACKET, and the PARA was the garrison mascot. The death of the cat was deeply regretted by the men, and news of the fatality was communicated to General Beauregard in the official report of the action.
 
Erected 1963 by Georgia Historical Commission.
 
Location. 31° 53.4′ N, 81° 11.894′ W. Marker is in Richmond Hill, Georgia, in Bryan County. Marker is on Fort McAllister Road. Touch for map. Located in Fort McAllister State Park, behind visitor center. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond Hill GA 31324, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Major John B. Gallie (a few steps from this marker); Capt. John McCrady (a few steps from this marker); Fort McAllister The Assault From The Rear (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort McAllister The Naval Bombardments (within shouting distance of this
Tom Cat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Tom Cat Marker
marker); Destruction of the C.S.S. Nashville (within shouting distance of this marker); C.S.S. Nashville (within shouting distance of this marker); Sinking of the CSS ''Nashville (Rattlesnake)" (within shouting distance of this marker); Machinery From The C.S.S. Nashville (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond Hill.
 
Also see . . .  The Phantom Feline of the Savannah River Defenses. “Tom Cat” was a coal black cat that was loved and adored by the fortís defenders. It was reported that “Tom Cat” would run back and forth along the fortís defenses during the maelstrom of combat. Each time, “Tom Cat” would wager one of his nine lives dodging the wall of lead cannon and musket balls that flew overhead. In the late 1930ís, world famous industrialist Henry Ford took an active interest in the historical preservation of Fort McAllister. Ford purchased the Civil War landmark and invested his own money in the extensive re-construction of this famous fort. Today, Fort McAllister is the best-preserved Civil War era earthen fortification in the South. But like may other Southern historic
Tom Cat Marker, near visitor center at Ft McAllister image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Tom Cat Marker, near visitor center at Ft McAllister
two of three missing markers at Ft McAllister
sites, this tranquil 1700 acre park has its own fare share of ghostly occupants. Fordís hired workers refused to spend the night at Fort McAllister because it was reported that strange noises could be heard emanating from the grounds. It has been said that source of the eerie noises was never identified and that the ghostly sounds that are reported at Fort McAllister today continue to be unexplained. In addition to the chilling noises, Re-enactors, visitors and park staff have reported seeing the ghosts of the forts most famous Civil War casualties. (Submitted on October 27, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. AnimalsForts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 27, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,943 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 27, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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