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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

South Side

President's Park

 
 
South Side Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, February 27, 2019
1. South Side Marker
Inscription.  
1. First Division Monument
This memorial honors the First Division of the United States Army


Originally made to commemorate the soldiers who gave their lives during World War I, the memorial features a gilded statue of Victory.

2. Butt-Millet Memorial Fountain
This fountain commemorates two men who lost their lives on the HMS Titanic in April 1912.


Major Archibald Wallingham Butt and Francis David Millet were well known in Washington. The fountain was also designed as a water fountain for police horses.

3. Second Division Memorial
This memorial honors the Second Division of the United States Army.


Originally made to commemorate the soldiers who gave their lives during World War I, the two wings of the original memorial were added in 1962.

4. Haupt Fountains
These fountains are a popular location for photographing the White House.


The fountains are each made from a 55-ton slab of rainbow granite and frames the White House as
South Side Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, February 27, 2019
2. South Side Marker
Sixteenth Street and Constitution Avenue.

5. Zero Milestone
This marker is the official point for measuring distances from Washington, D.C.


This pink granite shaft stands on the north and south meridian of the District of Columbia. All four sides are inscribed.

6. National Christmas Tree
This Blue Colorado spruce is the National Christmas Tree.


Since 1922, the President has lit a Christmas tree on the White House grounds. This tree from York, Pennsylvania was planted on the Ellipse in 1976.

7. General Sherman Statue
A bronze equestrian statue of Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891).


This monument is adorned with medallions of generals who served under Sherman's command and the names of the battles in which he fought.

8. Boy Scout Memorial
This bronze statue memorializes the Boy Scouts of America


The memorial stands on the site of the first Boy Scout Jamboree. It is one of the few memorials in Washington, D.C. commemorating a living cause.

9. Original Patentee Memorial
This granite shaft commemorates the the eighteen landowners whose property became the District of Columbia.


The names of the eighteen landowners are inscribed on the base. Each side is carved with a symbol of the early pioneers' agricultural pursuits.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 53.692′ N, 77° 2.095′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Ellipse Road Northwest west of 15th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is a window display at the Ellipse Visitor Center at President's Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20502, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. White House Ablaze (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The National Christmas Tree (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The National Christmas Tree (was about 400 feet away but has been reported permanently removed. ); Boy Scout Memorial (about 400 feet away); Original Patentees Memorial (about 400 feet away); William Tecumseh Sherman (about 400 feet away); Zero Milestone (about 500 feet away); White House Kitchen Garden (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown.
 
Categories. War, World IWaterways & Vessels
 
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Credits. This page was last revised on March 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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