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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Summerdale in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Summerdale / Summerdale's Turpentine Still

 
 
Summerdale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 6, 2019
1. Summerdale Marker
Inscription.  
Summerdale
The Summerdale area was settled in the early 1850's by several families of Scotch and Irish descent. By 1900, the town had a church, a saw mill, a turpentine business, and a hotel. Many families of different nationalities moved here, building homes, and clearing timberland for farming. The first train came to town on May 11, 1905 and crops could then be shipped great distances by rail. The town began to grow and construction of another hotel, a canning factory, a general merchandise store, and a post office soon followed. The town's agriculture flourished with crops of cotton, potatoes, peanuts, and tobacco. Many of the original farms are still in production. A three-story Tobacco Barn, standing today, was built around 1909 to store the high quality leaves for making cigars. By 1928, Summerdale became known as the Sunshine Town of Baldwin Countyand through the years it has kept this image.

Summerdale's Turpentine Still
In 1860, Robert Baker and Stephen Potts purchased 12,000 acres of land in Baldwin County that would become Magnolia Springs, Silverhill, Robertsdale,
Summerdale's Turpentine Still Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 6, 2019
2. Summerdale's Turpentine Still Marker
Surmmerdale, and Marlow. They began a turpentine manufacturing business. Because of the value of turpentine for heat, medicinal uses, and for sealing the hulls of ships, it was important to this area. During the midst of the War Between the States, workers dug deep trenches to save the rosin from the turpentine still in case the approaching Yankees set fire to the surrounding woods. The stored rosin was not discovered and several years after the war, it was dug up and sent to other local turpentine manufacturers. The location of these trenches and the turpentine still was in the vicinity of the Old Dixie Road, now County Road 32, which was built by Confederate soldiers.
 
Erected 2018 by City of Summerdale, C.S. Stewart UDC, and Baldwin County Historic Development Commission AL200 2017.
 
Location. 30° 28.367′ N, 87° 42.188′ W. Marker is in Summerdale, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker is at the intersection of County Road 32 and State Route 59, on the right when traveling west on County Road 32. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 910 AL-59, Summerdale AL 36580, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sonora Community / Sonora School and Community Hall (approx. 2.1 miles away); City of Foley Camellia Walk
View of marker at intersection of AL-59 and CR-32. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 6, 2019
3. View of marker at intersection of AL-59 and CR-32.
(approx. 4.7 miles away); Cobb's Light (approx. 4.7 miles away); City of Foley (approx. 4.7 miles away); The Springs (approx. 6.3 miles away); Magnolia Springs, Alabama (approx. 6.4 miles away); The Charles Swift Family / Swift Coles Historic Home (approx. 11.2 miles away); Daphne United Methodist Church (approx. 11.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Summerdale dedicates first historical marker. (Submitted on March 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Looking north on Alabama Highway 59. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 6, 2019
4. Looking north on Alabama Highway 59.
 
More. Search the internet for Summerdale / Summerdale's Turpentine Still.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 8, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 56 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 8, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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