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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Foley Square c. 1730

The African Burial Ground Story

 
 
Foley Square c. 1730 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 3, 2019
1. Foley Square c. 1730 Marker
Inscription.  
This medallion lies just beyond the edge of the African Burial Ground. Closed in 1794, the African Burial ground once covered more than 5 acres – about 5 city blocks. It is estimated that about 10,000 men, women and children of African Heritage were buried in the original cemetery. Nestled between hills, a portion of the graveyard was covered with earth and buildings as the city expanded northward. It was assumed destroyed by centuries of development; however, in the early 1900’s intact burials were unearthed during the construction of 290 Broadway. The site is now a National Historic Landmark and within the New York City African Burial Ground and Commons Historic District. The surviving remnant of the burial ground is dedicated to all who were enslaved in the city’s early history from 1825 until July 4, 1827, Emancipation Day in New York.
 
Location. 40° 42.854′ N, 74° 0.209′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Lafayette Street and Duane Street, on the right when traveling south on Lafayette Street. Touch for map. The marker is set flat into the pavement. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Judge Walter R. Mansfield Memorial (here, next to this marker); Triumph of the Human Spirit
Foley Square c. 1730 marker site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 23, 2019
2. Foley Square c. 1730 marker site
The Judge Walter R. Mansfield Memorial is also visible.
(within shouting distance of this marker); African Burial Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Civic Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Africans in Early New York (within shouting distance of this marker); Changing Landscape Obscures the Past (within shouting distance of this marker); Foley Square c. 1800 (within shouting distance of this marker); Sacred Tradition, Sacred Ground (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Regarding Foley Square c. 1730. One of several markers in the area dealing with Foley Square and/or The African Burial Ground.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsColonial Era
 
Foley Square c. 1730 marker, center motif image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 3, 2019
3. Foley Square c. 1730 marker, center motif
The African Burial Ground 1712-1794
Foley Square c. 1730 marker, lower half image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 3, 2019
4. Foley Square c. 1730 marker, lower half
Left motif: The African Free School – 1878
Center motif: Foley Square c. 1730 area map with a “You Are Here” reference point near the center.
Right motif: African landowners and farmers under Dutch rule
Text ribbon: Do you want to see me broken?/Shoulders falling down like teardrops/weakened by my soulful cries./Does my haughtiness offend you?/Don’t you take it awful hard/cause I laugh like I got a gold mine/diggin’ in my own backyard./You may shoot me with your words./ You may cut me with your eyes./You may kill me with your hatefulness,/But still like air I rise.
Foley Square c. 1730 marker, upper half image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 3, 2019
5. Foley Square c. 1730 marker, upper half
Left motif: Mourners at a gravesite in the African Burial Ground
Central motif: The African Burial Ground Story text
Right motif: First slave auction in New Amsterdam – 1655
Text ribbon: Out of the huts of history’s shame/I rise/up from a past that’s rooted in pain/I rise/I’m a black ocean/leaping and wide/Welling and swelling I bear the tide./Leaving behind nights of terror and fear/I rise/Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear/I rise/ Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave/I am the dream and the hope of the slave/I rise
 
More. Search the internet for Foley Square c. 1730.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 9, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on March 9, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   2. submitted on March 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   3, 4, 5. submitted on March 9, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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