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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Steam Tug Baltimore

1906

 

—National Historic Landmark —

 
Steam Tug <i>Baltimore</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, March 15, 2019
1. Steam Tug Baltimore Marker
Inscription. Steam Tug Baltimore was built at the foot of Federal Hill, at a cost of approximately $30,000. S.T. Baltimore served the city from 1906 to 1962. In 1963, Maryland Shipbuilding and Dry Dock sold the Baltimore to family in Cecil County, who used it as their personal yacht until 1979, when it sank in the Sassafras River.

In 1981 the Baltimore was raised from the Sassafras River and transported to the museum for its restoration and preservation. From 1990-1999, she gave rides in the harbor with an all volunteer crew. In 1993, S.T. Baltimore was granted National Historic Landmark status by the National Park Service. In 2009, the BMI received a Save America's Treasures grant to continue her restoration.

Built — Skinner Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Baltimore, 1906
Gross Tonnage — 81
Weight — 144 tons
Length — 88' 10½" B.P.
Breadth — 18.6 feet
Boiler — Hand-fired scotch boiler, 150psi
Propulsion — Steam Reciprocating, 12" x 25" x 22"
Horse Power — 330
Speed — 11 knots, 156 rpm
Hull — Riveted Wrought Iron
House
Side of marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, March 15, 2019
2. Side of marker
Georgia Pine and Oak
Superstructure — Wood
Design — Plumb Bow, Fantail Stern

Towing Vessel / Inspection Tug / Ice Breaker
The last hand-fired, coal burning operational steam tug in the U.S.
Donated by Samuel F. duPont in 1981.

[Side of marker:]
The harbor was susceptible to ice build up during the winter months and the S.T. Baltimore was one of the many tugs employed as icebreakers. Icebreakers had reinforced bows which could force through ice, clearing a path for commercial vessels coming to and from Baltimore.
 
Erected by The Baltimore Museum of Industry. (Marker Number 3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 39° 16.449′ N, 76° 36.057′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from Key Highway east of Boyle Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1415 Key Highway, Baltimore MD 21230, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bethlehem Steel Shipyard Crane (here, next to this marker); Hull of the Gov. R.M. McLane
Steam Tug <i>Baltimore</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, March 15, 2019
3. Steam Tug Baltimore Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Knabe Piano Factory Cupola (a few steps from this marker); Working Point by David Hess (a few steps from this marker); Platt and Company Oyster Packers (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Platt and Company Oyster Packers (within shouting distance of this marker); Raymond R. Allen Court (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Look-Out (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 16, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 16, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 113 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 16, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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