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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Wheeless in Cimarron County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Santa Fe Trail

 
 
Santa Fe Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 13, 2011
1. Santa Fe Trail Marker
Inscription.  
1994
Santa Fe Trail
Cimarron Route
1822-1880


Marker by the
High Plains Chapter
Daughters of the
American Revolution

Oklahoma

 
Erected 1994 by High Plains Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Santa Fe Trail marker series.
 
Location. 36° 47.199′ N, 102° 48.318′ W. Marker is near Wheeless, Oklahoma, in Cimarron County. Marker is on State Highway 325 3.6 miles north of E0190 Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on the west side of the highway, at the point where the Santa Fe Trail crossed here from east to west. Marker is in this post office area: Boise City OK 73933, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Santa Fe Trail (a few steps from this marker); Fort Nichols (a few steps from this marker).
 
Regarding Santa Fe Trail. Google Maps aerial view clearly shows the Santa
Santa Fe Trail Marker (<i>wide view; showing adjacent Fort Nichols marker on right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 13, 2011
2. Santa Fe Trail Marker (wide view; showing adjacent Fort Nichols marker on right)
Established in May 1865, by Kit Carson, hero of Valverde and Brig. Gen., New Mexico Volunteers, to guard Santa Fe Trail and furnish escorts for caravans engaged in Santa Fe trade. Santa Fe Trail crossed this highway here and was first traveled by William Becknell's expedition from Missouri in 1823.
Fe Trail wagon ruts running east/west through this location.
 
Also see . . .
1. Santa Fe Trail Association. In 1821, the Santa Fe Trail became America's first great international commercial highway, and for nearly sixty years thereafter was one of the nation's great routes of adventure and western expansion. (Submitted on March 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Great Prairie Highway. The Santa Fe Trail was a two-way international commercial highway used by both Mexican and American traders. Commercial freighting along the trail boomed to unheard-of levels, including considerable military freight hauling to supply the southwestern forts. The trail was also used by stagecoach lines, thousands of gold seekers heading to the California and Colorado gold fields, adventurers, missionaries, wealthy New Mexican families and emigrants. (Submitted on March 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Santa Fe Trail Marker (<i>wide view; showing adjacent Santa Fe Trail sign on left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 13, 2011
3. Santa Fe Trail Marker (wide view; showing adjacent Santa Fe Trail sign on left)
Santa Fe Trail
Surveyed by J. C. Brown 1826-27
Heaviest traffic during California Gold Rush 1849
Abandoned on completion of A.T. & S.F. Railroad in 1880
 
More. Search the internet for Santa Fe Trail.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 102 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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