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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Moore in Spartanburg County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of Fredonia

 
 
Site of Fredonia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 1, 2008
1. Site of Fredonia Marker
Inscription.
Believed built in 1786 by Thomas Moore, Revolutionary soldier, brigadier general in the War of 1812 and a member of Congress, Fredonia was later owned by Andrew B. Moore, earliest known doctor in this region, and Thomas J. Moore, Confederate soldier and state legislator. On the National Register of Historical Places. The house burned in 1977.
 
Erected 1979 by Spartanburg County Historical Association. (Marker Number 42-9.)
 
Location. 34° 50.066′ N, 81° 58.903′ W. Marker is near Moore, South Carolina, in Spartanburg County. Marker is on U.S. 221 0.1 miles north of Moore-Duncan Highway (State Highway 290), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moore SC 29369, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. “Kate Barry” (approx. 0.8 miles away); Walnut Grove Plantation (approx. 0.8 miles away); Emmanuel Baptist Church Veterans Monument (approx. 2.7 miles away); Crash Site of USA AF A20G Havoc (approx. 4.1 miles away); First Erosion Control Work in the Southeast (approx. 4.6 miles
Site of Fredonia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 1, 2008
2. Site of Fredonia Marker
Land around marker
away); Nazareth Frame House (approx. 5.1 miles away); Nazareth Church Stone Marker (approx. 5.2 miles away); Nazareth Church (approx. 5.5 miles away); John B. White Sr., Blvd. (approx. 6.1 miles away); S.J. Workman Highway (approx. 6.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moore.
 
Regarding Site of Fredonia. Fredonia was a large vernacular house that typified a family structure as it was modified by succeeding generations. It had evolved from a single log cabin built around 1786 to a two story Georgian house constructed around 1800. A Greek Revival portico was added to the front facade around 1840. The house had a Victorian appearance and doubled in size around 1900. Nothing remains of the structure after it burned in 1977. It was removed from the National Register in 1981.
 
Also see . . .  Fredonia. Fredonia is a large vernacular house that typifies a family structure as it was modified by succeeding generations to suit changing needs and prevailing architectural fashions. (Submitted on November 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PlacesWar of 1812War, US CivilWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,083 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 1, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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