Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Ticket to Ride

 
 
Ticket to Ride Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, April 1, 2019
1. Ticket to Ride Marker
Inscription.  
Many bus routes currently ending at this terminal began as nineteenth-century streetcar lines transporting city folks over sand dunes to the Western shore.

Prior to 1884, San Francisco's transit service to Ocean Beach was via omnibus — an enlarged version of a stagecoach seating about eighteen passengers and hauled by two- or four-horse teams. But such limited transportation could not accomodate the masses who flocked to the beach, the Seal Rock House resort, and the Cliff House in the late 1800s.

In December 1883, the Market Street Cable Railway Company met the public's needs by extending its service of steam-powered trams to Ocean Beach. The instantly popular Park & Ocean Railroad line carried thousands of beachgoers from Haight and Stanyan streets to the Ocean Beach Terminal, which was then located at La Playa and Balboa streets (the terminal was moved to this location in 1995).

In 1912, the San Francisco Municipal Railway Company, or Muni, came into existence and in 1913 expanded its "B Line" service from Geary and 33rd Avenue to the beach. By 1925, Muni had bought out their competitors' transit franchises
Left images image. Click for full size.
Courtesy: Collection of Ted Wurth (top); Courtesy: Marilyn Blaisdell Collection (bottom), April 1, 2019
2. Left images
Top: Crowds board Muni's #2 bus and a "B" car in 1927.

Bottom: Street car terminus, Cabrillo and the Great Highway.
and consolidated all public transportation within the city; it continues to provide local service today.

The turn-of-the-century expansion of public transportation to this site couldn't have been more timely. The debut of carnival stands at the beach spawned the amusement mecca later known as Playland and created a demand for mass transporation to the city's shore.

"When we were kids, we were out here all the time and it was always great to go down to the beach... we'd run down to the beach, me and my brother. It could be the hottest day of the year and we'd still build a fire..."
Robert Smit
 
Erected 1996.
 
Location. 37° 46.405′ N, 122° 30.583′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is on Cabrillo Street near La Playa Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94121, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Turning Sand to Gold (here, next to this marker); Hints of History (a few steps from this marker); The City at Play (a few steps from this marker); A Memorable Muse (a few steps from this marker); Historical Site (within shouting
Right image image. Click for full size.
Courtesy: San Francisco Public Library, April 1, 2019
3. Right image
A #5 streetcar near The Big Dipper roller coaster.
distance of this marker); Roald Amundsen (approx. ¼ mile away); The New Cliff House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Schooner Parallel “Blown to Atoms” 1887 (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Also see . . .
1. Market Street Railway Company, Past, Present and Future. Article from September 1925 San Francisco News Letter posted on the website of The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco. (Submitted on April 10, 2019, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 

2. Muni History. (Submitted on April 10, 2019, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.)
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
Lower image image. Click for full size.
Courtesy: San Francisco Public Library, April 1, 2019
4. Lower image
San Francisco Muni — early bus service to the beach.
Ticket to Ride Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, April 1, 2019
5. Ticket to Ride Marker
This marker is at the far right.
Ticket to Ride Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, April 1, 2019
6. Ticket to Ride Marker
 
More. Search the internet for Ticket to Ride.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 10, 2019, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 10, 2019, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.