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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brooklyn in Kings County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Red Lion Inn

Revolutionary War Heritage Trail

 
 
Red Lion Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
1. Red Lion Inn Marker
Inscription. Near here stood the Red Lion Inn, marking the junction of three country roads: Martense Lane, which followed what is now the southern edge of the Green-Wood Cemetery; the Narrows Road, which came up the shore of New York Bay from Denyse’s Ferry; and the Gowanus Road, which led back up to Brooklyn Heights. On August 27, 1776, the Battle of Brooklyn began when a British column under General James Grant attacked American pickets defending the Red Lion.

Although the Americans put up a stubborn resistance, Grant’s forces pushed them back up the Gowanus Road toward the old Stone House. From there, thanks to a heroic counterattack by General Stirling, they were able to reach safety in Brooklyn Heights.

The British objective was Brooklyn Heights, which was vital to the defense of The City of New York.
 
Erected by State of New York.
 
Location. 40° 39.283′ N, 74° 0.179′ W. Marker is in Brooklyn, New York, in Kings County. Marker is on 35th Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in Green-Wood Cemetery, near the 35th Street entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Brooklyn NY 11232, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Delaware Regiment (a few steps
Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
2. Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery
This road in Green-Wood Cemetery is actually a preserved section of the old Martense Road. Several historical markers are located here.
from this marker); John Brooks Henderson (approx. half a mile away); The Green-Wood Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Green-Wood Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Green-Wood Cemetery Gates (approx. half a mile away); William Moir Smith (approx. half a mile away); Governor DeWitt Clinton (approx. half a mile away); Samuel F. B. Morse (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brooklyn.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker features a picture of what the Red Lion Inn might have looked like. It has a caption of “Although there is no historic image of the Red Lion Inn, it probably looked a lot like Howard’s Half-Way House, a typical Long Island country inn. Image of Howard’s Inn – Picture Collection, The Branch Libraries, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox and Tilden Foundations.
Also on the marker are a map of “A Plan of the Battle of Brooklyn” that “highlights the approximate location of this historic site.”,
Red Lion Inn Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 20, 2013
3. Red Lion Inn Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery
The marker can be seen here on the right.
and two pictures of soldiers of “The Continental Army. Picture Collection, the Branch Libraries, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox and Tilden Foundations.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Battle of Long Island 1776. A British perspective of the battle from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. History of the Old Stone House. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Old Stone House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
4. Old Stone House
After being overrun by British troops under General James Grant, the Americans defending the Red Lion Inn fell back to this house, before finally retreating to Brooklyn Heights.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,483 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on October 20, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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