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Greenwich in Washington County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village

The Abolition Movement and Underground Railroad

 

Greenwich, New York

 
Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, April 20, 2019
1. Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village Marker
Inscription.  
Greenwich, known as Union Village from 1809 to 1867, played a significant role in the history of the Anti-Slave Movement and the Underground Railroad. Many families in Union Village and surrounding area provided a safe haven for slaves heading north to freedom. The route from Troy through Easton to Union Village was a segment of the “thruway” for the Underground Railroad during the mid-1800s.

1) Henry Holmes, abolitionist, resided at 18 Church Street
2) William H. and Angelina Mowry lived at 6 Church Street. Both were strong abolitionists.
3) Edwin T. Masters resided at 146 Main Street. After the passing of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850, the family acquired slaves. It was theorized that because they were abolitionists, they were helping slaves escape.
4) Leonard Gibbs lived at 150 Main Street. Gibbs was a long-time abolitionist even though his family had owned slaves.
5) The Free Congregational Church parsonage at 28 Main Street was another likely stop.
6) Edwin Andrews was the only abolitionist in this group who did not belong to the Free Congregational Church. He resided at 2 Academy Street.
7)
Greenwich Main Street image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, April 20, 2019
2. Greenwich Main Street
The Free Congregational Church, founded by abolitionists in 1837, hosted up to 500 people for speakers such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. Following dissolution in 1877, the building became an opera house which was destroyed by fire in 1913.
8) The home of Dr. Hiram Corliss formerly on Bridge Street is believed to have had a secret windowless room in the basement where harbored fugitive slaves.
 
Erected by Washington County Historical Society.
 
Location. 43° 5.496′ N, 73° 30.079′ W. Marker is in Greenwich, New York, in Washington County. Marker is on Main Street (New York State Route 29) near Church Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greenwich NY 12834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. In Memory Of (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Continental Road (approx. 1.8 miles away); Breastworks of General Fellows (approx. 3.3 miles away); Baum Encampment (approx. 3 miles away); Deridder Horse Ferry (approx. 3.8 miles away); Town of Saratoga (approx. 3.8 miles away); Fort Hardy (approx. 3.9 miles away); Captain Furnival's Battery (approx. 3.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenwich.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, April 20, 2019
3. Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village Marker
 

More. Search the internet for Underground Railroad Stops in Union Village.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 24, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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