Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Mary Musgrove

 
 
Mary Musgrove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 27, 2019
1. Mary Musgrove Marker
Inscription.  Mary Musgrove was the daughter of an English trader and a Creek Indian mother. In 1717 she and her husband, John, established Cowpens trading post near the Savannah River which became a center of 18th century English-Indian trade for deer hides. After the colony's founding in 1733, Musgrove became principal interpreter between Yamacraw Chieftain Tomochichi and Gen. Oglethorpe. Serving as Oglethorpe's interpreter for ten years, she helped foster peace between the British and the Creeks. For her assistance she received financial compensation, political prestige, and lands from the Creeks making her the wealthiest Georgia landowner in the 1700s. The Georgia colony refused to grant Musgrove's property rights to the Creek lands of St. Catherines, Sapelo, and Ossabaw Islands. After much dispute, Musgrove received the English title to St. Catherines Island in 1760, where she died c.1765.
Erected by the Georgia Historical Society,
and the National Society of the Colonial Dames in the State of Georgia
2019.1 • 25-61

 
Erected 2019 by Georgia Historical Society and the
Mary Musgrove Marker (<i>view looking south; Abercorn Street & Charlton St. intersection behind</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 27, 2019
2. Mary Musgrove Marker (view looking south; Abercorn Street & Charlton St. intersection behind)
National Society of the Colonial Dames in the State of Georgia. (Marker Number 25-61.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.377′ N, 81° 5.524′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Abercorn Street south of East Macon Street, on the left when traveling south. Marker is located beside the walkway, near the southwest corner of Savannah's Lafayette Square. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 201 East Charlton Street, Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrew Low House (a few steps from this marker); Colonial Dames House (within shouting distance of this marker); Marist Place (within shouting distance of this marker); First Girl Scout Headquarters in America (within shouting distance of this marker); Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home (within shouting distance of this marker); Cathedral of St. John the Baptist (within shouting distance of this marker); Birthplace of Girl Scouting (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Juliette Low (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mary Musgrove historical marker set for official dedication
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
. The Georgia Historical Society (GHS) in conjunction with the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia (NSCDA-GA) will dedicate a new historical marker detailing the life of iconic Savannah historical figure Mary Musgrove. Keynote speaker for the event is Stan Deaton, Ph.D., who serves as the Dr. Elaine B. Andrews Distinguished Historian at the Georgia Historical Society. The dedication happens Friday, April 26, at 5:30 p.m. in Lafayette Square. (Submitted on April 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mary Musgrove. While most won’t recognize the Creek name Coosaponakeesa, the name Mary Musgrove may spark recognition. Mary Musgrove proved instrumental in maintaining peace and fair trade between the Creek nation and the new Georgia colony. She attracted the attention of General James Oglethorpe and served as his main interpreter from 1733 to 1743. Musgrove married three times, all the while increasing her business acumen and sharpening her diplomatic skills. The marriage to her last husband, a Christian missionary named Thomas Bosomworth, elevated Musgrove to a social status heretofore unreached by someone of Creek descent. (Submitted on April 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Savannah honors unsung female hero of Georgia colony. (Submitted on April 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
 
Categories.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Colonial EraNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWomen
 

More. Search the internet for Mary Musgrove.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 106 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Paid Advertisement