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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Concord in Muskingum County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

S-Bridge

 
 
S-Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 26, 2008
1. S-Bridge Marker
Inscription. Coaches, Conestoga wagons, herds of livestock, pioneers on foot or horseback, peddlers, soldiers, beggers - these and many others have crossed this bridge on the National Road since 1830. Escaping slaves sought shelter beneath it.
Like many others on the road, the bridge was built with well-cut stone and good mortar in the shape of an "S" because it was easier to erect than one thrown straight across an oblique stream.
 
Erected 1964 by New Concord Garden Club and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 2-60.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection, and the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 59.569′ N, 81° 44.784′ W. Marker is in New Concord, Ohio, in Muskingum County. Marker is on U.S. 40, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker and bridge are just west of Shadyside Drive. Marker is in this post office area: New Concord OH 43762, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fox Creek Bridge (a few steps from this marker); Zane's Trace (within shouting distance of this marker); Findley Settlement (approx. 0.4 miles
S-Bridge OSDAR Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 26, 2008
2. S-Bridge OSDAR Marker
away); John Glenn (approx. half a mile away); Muskingum College (approx. 0.6 miles away); Robert Francis Harper (approx. 0.6 miles away); William Rainey Harper (approx. 0.6 miles away); College Drive Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Concord.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRBridges & ViaductsMilitaryRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Fox Creek "S" Bridge Park image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.,
3. The Fox Creek "S" Bridge Park
The Fox Creek “S” Bridge is one of a series of such bridges which lined the path of the National Road. All but a handful were destroyed during the construction of U.S. Route 40. The National Road, completed here in 1828, “opened wide the doors to the West.” Every township crossed by the Road doubled its population in a decade. The entire National Road from Cumberland, Maryland, to Vandalia, Illinois, was bricked during World War I to accommodate military traffic. The Fox Creek “S” Bridge was the last section to be bricked. The photo below records this event in 1919.

The house at the top of the picture to the left is that of Robert West Speer, a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. Speer was a Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter). His denomination, as well as the Associate Presbyterians (Seceders) and the Associate Reformed Presbyterians made the Fox Creek/Crooked Creek area a bastion of Abolitionism before and during the Civil War.
S-Bridge and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 26, 2008
4. S-Bridge and Marker
Looking east.
S-Bridge and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., S Bridge
5. S-Bridge and Marker
Looking west.
S-Bridge South Face image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., S Bridge
6. S-Bridge South Face
S-Bridge Culvert image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., S Bridge
7. S-Bridge Culvert
S-Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Michael Widner, 1988
8. S-Bridge
Mileage Marker at S-Bridge image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 26, 2008
9. Mileage Marker at S-Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,161 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 6, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   8. submitted on August 3, 2013.   9. submitted on November 6, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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