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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

King Kamehameha I

Thomas Ridgeway Gould

 

—Bronze, 1883 —

 
<i>King Kamehameha I</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
1. King Kamehameha I Marker
Inscription. King Kamehameha I (c. 1758–1819) is generally recognized as the most important figure in Hawaiian history. He was a wise ruler who enacted laws to protect the defenseless and to bring order to the newly united kingdom. An astute statesman, he encouraged foreign trade and the use of foreign technology, while avoiding foreign rule. His greatest achievement, through warfare and diplomacy, was the unification of the Hawaiian Islands.

As befits a man of enormous historic and symbolic importance, this statue depicts King Kamehameha I wearing the regalia of an ali’i nui (paramount chief or king) which includes the mahiole (feathered helmet), the ‘ahu‘ula (a long feathered cloak signifying chiefly rank), and the ka ‘el kapu o Liole (the sacred sash of Liloa, a feathered sash, worn around the waist and over the shoulder, a symbol of supreme authority). He carries the ihe laumeki (barbed spear) in his left hand to symbolize his life as a brave warrior. He extends his right hand in a welcoming gesture of aloha to denote his life as a wise and just statesman and unifier of a people and a kingdom.

Law of the Splintered Paddle. Ke Kānāwai Māmalahoe, or Law of the Splintered Paddle, was established by King Kamehameha I and assured that every man, woman and child
King Kamehameha I Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
2. King Kamehameha I Monument
1881 bronze with gold leaf by Thomas Ridgeway Gould (1818–1881) is approx 8½ feet tall on a 10 foot concrete base. Base has four bronze and gold leaf plaques depicting scenes from his life.
would be able to travel freely and in peace, with the right “to lie down to sleep by the roadside without fear of harm.”

Display of Courage. As a young boy, Kamehameha received training in the various Hawaiian martial arts while residing in Ka‘ū with his uncle, Kalani‘ōpu‘u. Here the warrior-chief displays his courage and his special gift at deflecting and seizing spears hurled all at once.

Aboard the H.M.S. Resolution. Offshore the island of Maui in 1778, the young chief Kamehameha is welcomed aboard the H.M.S. Resolution by British explorer Captain James Cook. Captain Cook commanded the first foreign fleet to visit the Hawaiian Islands.

Ka ‘Au Wa‘a Peleleu. King Kamehameha I here reviews his famous ‘au wa‘a peleleu, a fleet of war canoes. The fleet, which consisted of up to 800 double-hulled canoes carved from massive koa trees, was capable of transporting up to 8000 warriors between the islands.
 
Erected 1883.
 
Location. 21° 18.345′ N, 157° 51.575′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is on South King Street north of Punchbowl Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. It is in front of the Aliiolani Hale and across from the
Kamehameha I (1738–1819) image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
3. Kamehameha I (1738–1819)
Also known as Kamehameha the Great, he conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawai‘i in 1810.
Iolani Palace. Marker is at or near this postal address: 417 S King St, Honolulu HI 96813, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aliiolani Hale ( within shouting distance of this marker); Iolani Palace ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); King William Charles Lunalilo ( about 600 feet away); Kawaiaha‘o Landmark ( about 600 feet away); Kawaiaha'o Church ( about 700 feet away); Hiram Bingham ( about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Kawaiaha'o Landmark ( approx. 0.2 miles away); Reverend James Kekela ( approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Honolulu.
 
Regarding King Kamehameha I. Thomas Ridgeway Gould was commissioned to create a statue of Kamehameha by the legislature of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi. He modeled the figure at his studio in Rome in 1879 and it was cast in Paris in 1880. The statue was lost in a shipwreck on its way to Hawaii. A second statue was cast from the same mold, arrived safely, and was unveiled by Hawaiʻi’s last king, Kalakaua, in 1883. The first statue was subsequently recovered and in 1912 it was placed at Kohala Court House in Kapa‘au on the Island of Hawai‘i, Kamehameha’s home.
 
Also see . . .
Law of the Splintered Paddle image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
4. Law of the Splintered Paddle
Plaque on front of base.

1. Kamehameha I. Wikipedia entry. “When Kamehameha (Paiʻea) was born, [Chief] Alapaʻi ordered the child killed. One of his kahuna had warned him that a fiery light in the sky [ Halley’s Comet] would signal the birth of a ‘killer of chiefs,’ or aliʻi. Alapaʻi, nervous at the thought of this child eventually usurping his rule, decided to take no chances. Paiʻea’s parents, however, had anticipated this. As soon as he was born, he was given into the care of Naeʻole, another aliʻi, and disappeared from sight. Naeʻole raised Paiʻea for the first few years of his life. Five years after his birth, Alapaʻi, perhaps remorseful of his actions, invited the child back to live with his family. There under the guidance of his kahu (teacher), Kekuhaupiʻo, he learned the ways of court diplomacy and war.” (Submitted on November 15, 2008.) 

2. Wikipedia entry for the three Kamehameha Statues. (Submitted on January 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Display of Courage image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
5. Display of Courage
Plaque on the back of base.
Aboard the H.M.S. Resolution image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
6. Aboard the H.M.S. Resolution
Plaque on the right side.
Ka ‘Au Wa‘a Peleleu image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
7. Ka ‘Au Wa‘a Peleleu
Plaque on left side of base.
Law of the Splintered Paddle image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
8. Law of the Splintered Paddle
Ke Kānāwai Māmalahoe, or Law of the Splintered Paddle, was established by King Kamehameha I and assured that every man, woman and child would be able to travel freely and in peace, with the right ‘to lie down to sleep by the roadside without fear of harm’.”
Display of Courage image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
9. Display of Courage
“As a young boy, Kamehameha received training in the various Hawaiian martial arts while residing in Ka‘ū with his uncle, Kalani‘ōpu‘u. Here the warrior-chief displays his courage and his special gift at deflecting and seizing spears hurled all at once.”
Aboard the H.M.S. Resolution image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
10. Aboard the H.M.S. Resolution
“Offshore the island of Maui in 1778, the young chief Kamehameha is welcomed aboard the H.M.S. Resolution by British explorer Captain James Cook. Captain Cook commanded the first foreign fleet to visit the Hawaiian Islands.”
Ka ‘Au Wa‘a Peleleu image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
11. Ka ‘Au Wa‘a Peleleu
“King Kamehameha I here reviews his famous ‘au wa‘a peleleu, a fleet of war canoes. The fleet, which consisted of up to 800 double-hulled canoes carved from massive koa trees, was capable of transporting up to 8000 warriors between the islands.”
His Majesty Kamehameha I, King of the Hawaiian Islands image. Click for full size.
Image from the Wikimedia Commons
12. His Majesty Kamehameha I, King of the Hawaiian Islands
His full name was Kalani Paiʻea Wohi o Kaleikini Kealiʻikui Kamehameha o ʻIolani i Kaiwikapu kaui Ka Liholiho Kūnuiākea. Painting is in the Hawaii State Archives.
King Kamehameha I Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
13. King Kamehameha I Marker
Marker and one of the four tablets that interpret the four plaques on the base of the statue are placed at the edge of the circular sidewalk. The two blue signs above the tablets read “Please Keep Off Grass” in English and Japanese.
King Kamehameha I Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
14. King Kamehameha I Monument
<i>King Kamehameha I: First King of All Hawaii...</i><br>Statue in Washington D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
15. King Kamehameha I: First King of All Hawaii...
Statue in Washington D.C.
- a third casting of Thomas Ridgeway Gould's creation, placed in the National Statuary Hall Collection of the U.S. Capitol (along with one of Father Damien of Molokai) in 1969.
<i>King Kamehameha I</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 19, 2014
16. King Kamehameha I Marker
<i>King Kamehameha I</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 19, 2014
17. King Kamehameha I Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 15, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,569 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on November 15, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   15. submitted on January 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   16, 17. submitted on April 27, 2014, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.
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