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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Scranton in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lackawanna River Watershed History

 
 
Lackawanna River Watershed History Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
1. Lackawanna River Watershed History Marker
Inscription.  

1700's (Native Americans & Early Settlers) — This area was once home to the Monsey Indians, a branch of the Delaware Indians. After William Penn bought land along the Delaware River from the Delaware Indians, the Monseys relocated along the Lackawanna River, under the leadership of Chief Capoose (Capouse), in a settlement called Capoose's Meadow. The location of the main settlement was just across the River from Sweeney's Beach closer to Weston Field. Until 1771 wigwams were common along both banks of the Lackawanna River. At that time the banks were fertile for farming and the River was abundant with shad and trout and the adjacent woodlands were home to turkey, rabbit, moose, elk, deer, beaver, otter and mountain lion. (The History and Geography of Scranton and Its Vicinity)

1800's (Industrial Revolution & Immigrants) — Iron Production, Coal Mining and Railroads dominated the Lackawanna Valley and greatly impacted the Lackawanna River and the local landscape. Development of the coal mines attracted thousands of immigrants, which further stressed local natural resources. In 1840, the Iron

Lackawanna River Watershed History and Other Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
2. Lackawanna River Watershed History and Other Markers
Furnaces were built along Roaring Brook and produced T-rails used in building the transcontinental railroad. In 1853, the first locomotive of the Delaware and Lackawanna Railroad came to the Lackawanna Valley. The first electric trolley car system started in 1886. The famous George Inness painting "Lackawanna Valley" clearly foreshadows the anthropogenic impacts awaiting the Lackawanna River Watershed.

1900's (Environmental Degradation) — Scranton's population peaked at just over 143,000 in 1930. The anthracite industry remained the primary supporting industry, however, other industries like textile manufacturing also grew significantly. These industries and the basic needs of a large population stressed the environment. Coal waste piles, coal breakers, textile mills, button factories and housing all required large expanses of land and the Lackawanna Valley landscape was forever changed due to earth moving and loss of woodlands. Further, gas manufacturing facilities, direct release of sewage and wastewater to the Lackawanna River and municipal landfills and incinerators left the Lackawanna River devoid of life. The LRCA was founded in 1987 to start the healing process.

2000's (Environmental Restoration) — The LRCA decided to name the site Sweeney's Beach in recognition of Sweeney Brothers - a major highway and excavation contractor in the Scranton

Lackawanna River from Sweeney's Beach image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
3. Lackawanna River from Sweeney's Beach
area in the early 20th Century that had their contractor yard at this location. The site also housed tracks for the Green Ridge Branch of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad and a city-run incinerator. Once abandoned, the footprint of the rail line became an access road from Poplar Street to maintain sewer lines and gain access into the Lackawanna College practice athletic fields. LRCA approached Lackawanna College and D & L Realty of Dunmore, owner of the former railroad track and received permission to use the driveway to access the unused portion of city owned recreation land. In 2015, the City of Scranton approved leasing the property (Sweeney's Beach) to the LRCA and LVC. Site planning and restoration started in 2016 and continues today.


 
Erected 2019 by the Lackawanna River Conservation Association.
 
Location. 41° 25.25′ N, 75° 39.69′ W. Marker is in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in Lackawanna County. Markers are at Sweeney's Beach, SW off Poplar Street at the Lackawanna River. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 41 Poplar Street, Scranton PA 18509, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Munsee Indian Village (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pine Brook War Memorial (approx. mile away); The Electric City (approx.

Lackawanna River from Sweeney's Beach image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
4. Lackawanna River from Sweeney's Beach
0.4 miles away); Capoose (approx. 0.4 miles away); Miners and Laborers Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Scranton Preparatory School Seal (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Tripp House (approx. 0.6 miles away); 2 LT Carol Ann Drazba, RN (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scranton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lackawanna River at Wikipedia. (Submitted on June 27, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. DIY Fly Fishing the Lackawanna River. (Submitted on June 27, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Lackawanna River Conservation Association. (Submitted on June 27, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels
 
Lackawanna River Environmental Impact Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
5. Lackawanna River Environmental Impact Marker
Non-historical marker
Sweeney's Beach Restoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
6. Sweeney's Beach Restoration Marker
Non-historical marker
Lackawanna River Watershed Health Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 19, 2019
7. Lackawanna River Watershed Health Marker
Non-historical marker
 

More. Search the internet for Lackawanna River Watershed History.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 27, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 27, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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