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Foster in Bracken County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Kenton Ambushes Indians

 
 
Kenton Ambushes Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 13, 2019
1. Kenton Ambushes Indians Marker
Inscription.  In summer of 1793 Indians crossed Ohio River, hid canoes at mouth of Holt’s Creek, site of Foster, and proceeded to Bourbon County to steal horses. Simon Kenton secured a small group to ambush them on their return. After lying concealed for four days, Kenton’s men were successful; they killed six of the enemy, scattered the others, and retrieved the horses.
 
Erected 1977 by Kentucky Historical Society and Kentucky Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 1614.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 38° 48.217′ N, 84° 13.039′ W. Marker is in Foster, Kentucky, in Bracken County. Marker is at the intersection of Mary Ingles Highway (Kentucky Route 8) and Foster Road (Kentucky Route 2228), on the right when traveling east on Mary Ingles Highway. Can also be reached from AA Highway (KY-9). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Foster KY 41043, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Neville Veterans Memorial (approx. half a mile away in
Kenton Ambushes Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 13, 2019
2. Kenton Ambushes Indians Marker
Ohio); Neville – 1812 (approx. half a mile away in Ohio); Edgington Mound (approx. 1.4 miles away in Ohio); Bradford Schoolhouse (approx. 4½ miles away); Ulysses Simpson Grant (approx. 6.3 miles away in Ohio); Grant Memorial Bridge (approx. 6.3 miles away in Ohio); a different marker also named Ulysses Simpson Grant (approx. 6.3 miles away in Ohio); U.S. Grant Historic District (approx. 6.3 miles away in Ohio).
 
Also see . . .  Simon Kenton - Friends of the Frontier. “Kenton spent the next two years hunting along the Ohio River and searching for the legendary Canelands along the Ohio that he had heard so much about; the Shawnee called this land ‘Can-tuc-ee.’ In 1774, he served as a scout during Lord Dunmore’s War. By 1775, Kenton had moved to Boonesboro, Kentucky. For the next few years he was employed as a scout for the settlement, often coming in contact with the local Shawnee and at one point saving the life of Daniel Boone. The Indians also knew him as ‘The man whose gun is never empty’ for his skill of running and reloading his faithful flintlock at the same
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time.” (Submitted on July 7, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 

More. Search the internet for Kenton Ambushes Indians.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 7, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 7, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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